Wine and Roses–Character Intro and Excerpt #1

August 8, 2014

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Hello again! Gus (August Li) here to celebrate the release of my latest novel, Wine and Roses. As I said in a previous post, Wine and Roses is set in a fantasy universe but features everyday people. I’d like to introduce you to the main characters.

 

Alain Lamont is a vintner. He grows grapes and makes wines on Mountain Shadow Winery, which has been in his family for over five hundred years. Alain is quiet, even awkward in social situations at times, but he’s very dedicated to the vineyard and the dozens of families who live and work there. He shows his love best by working hard, sometimes to his own detriment. Alain loves taking care of the grapes and would never want to do anything else. He just wishes he had someone to share it with, but he doesn’t hold out much hope of finding a partner in a culture where homosexual relationships are forbidden, so he tries to content himself with his land and his work.

 

Alain’s life becomes much more difficult when a fire—the one Yarrow summoned in Ash and Echoes—destroys over half of the vineyard. With so many of his vines destroyed, Alain doesn’t know how he’ll make enough wine to sustain the vineyard or all the people living on it. Worst of all, he feels the weight is on his shoulders alone, and he feels more isolated than ever.

 

Most people can’t pronounce Fabrezio Orvina d’Caelus’s name, so when he joined a mercenary company, he was given the nickname Breeze, and it stuck. Breeze makes no apology for being a soldier for hire, and at first he has a hard time understanding how Alain can be so satisfied with life on the vineyard. He assumes it’s boring and can’t fathom that Alain doesn’t want to seek glory and excitement. Still, Breeze appreciates that Alain helped him when he was seriously wounded after the battle, and he wants to do what he can to repay Alain and get the winery back on its feet before he’s well enough to rejoin his company.

 

Breeze and Alain don’t get along very well at first. Breeze thinks Alain is uptight, and Alain is mistrustful of soldiers and mercenaries, especially after the fire. He sees Breeze as an opportunist—selfish and only interested in money. Breeze is also a mercenary and he talks and acts like one—he swears a lot, teases, and flirts with Alain, which Alain does not appreciate. It takes a long time before each of them sees there’s more to the other….

 

GrapesExcerpt:

 

Alain looked wan and pale when he came in with Breeze’s breakfast the following morning. The dark crescents under his blue eyes made Breeze wonder if he’d slept at all. He suspected Alain’s restlessness might have been his fault. He hadn’t realized Alain had lost his wife in the fire. What an ass.

Still, Alain offered him a smile as he set a tray bearing some porridge, boiled eggs, a slice of ham, and a bowl of beans on Breeze’s lap. He sat on the edge of the bed as he always did and poured wine. “How are you feeling this morning? Did you sleep well?”

“Better than it looks like you did. Why is that?”

“I’m fine.”

Breeze put down the forkful of bacon-flavored beans he’d been about to shovel into his mouth and took Alain’s hand. At his touch, Alain flinched and tried to pull away, but Breeze held firm, and eventually he relaxed. “Look, Alain. I’m just a sell-sword. I never claimed to be a scholar, but I feel like a stupid ass for not realizing you lost your wife in the fire. I hope that damned mage rots in the rankest pit of the Shades’ Abode. But I’m sorry for being dull-witted, and for letting my tongue wag like the fucking fool I am. I know I hurt you, and I’m sorry.”

When Alain looked at Breeze, tears glittered in his summer-sky eyes but didn’t fall. He shook his head. “No, I’ve never had a wife.”

“But Courtenay and Fenn?”

“My twin sister’s children. My niece and nephew. My brother-in-law, their father, died in the fire. I’m all they have left now. I… I don’t know if I’m good enough to raise them on my own. I love them, but I’m afraid I’ll fail them.”

“What happened to your sister?”

Alain caught the single tear he let fall on his fingertip and looked away to hide his grief. “She died giving birth to Fenn. Six years ago.”

Breeze didn’t know what to say, so he squeezed Alain’s hand a little tighter, and Alain squeezed back. What he really wanted to know was how Alain had remained unmarried. Breeze freely admitted he was a handsome man, with his rose-and-honey coloring and those expressive eyes. And lips—pink, firm, and full without looking pillowy or slack. Add to that his estate, and he could have his pick of the buxom country girls. If he wanted help with the children, why not take a wife? Could he be…. Damn, out of nowhere, Breeze really wanted to know whose body Alain imagined when he slid into bed and slipped his hand into his trousers. He could see it: Alain’s teeth denting his lower lip, red rushing all the way to the tips of his ears—

And he was a fucking pig for thinking about that while Alain struggled not to break down. Besides, it was none of his damned business who or what the vintner fucked, if anyone. Hopefully, in another month or so, he’d be long gone. On to better things. Still, he didn’t like seeing Alain suffering. “I’m sorry.” What a platitude. Breeze just wasn’t used to men who needed comforting.

Alain nodded. “Thank you. You should finish your breakfast so I can change your dressings. Best to get it over with.”

After a few more bites of food, Breeze asked, “Do you have a bathtub? I’m as rank as a whore’s underpants, and I’d kill for a proper wash.” He set his fork on his plate and scratched his chin. “And a shave.”

He didn’t know why that made Alain smile, but seeing it pleased him. “Why do you want to shave off your whiskers?”

“That’s just how it’s done in Espero. Men shave every day. The heat, I suppose. I’m just not used to these whiskers. Why, do you like them?”

Alain tensed visibly, and Breeze felt like horse’s ass. Again. He was making this a habit. Why had he said that?

“I don’t care about them one way or another. I just wondered. Most men in Selindria don’t shave their whiskers.”

“You do,” Breeze observed.

Alain touched his soft-looking cheek with the fingers of his splinted hand. The way Alain worked and took care of him, Breeze found it easy to forget about the other man’s injury. Truth be told, he bore it like a warrior. “Mine comes in all patchy. I can’t grow a proper beard, just little scraps here and there. I look like a fool when I don’t shave.”

Breeze wondered if the hair grew in little golden swaths down the center of his chest, his soft belly, between his legs. Bleeding Shades, he had to drive off the pictures in his head. They’d make an Elvaran street slag blush. “So, could I trouble you for a bath? I’m sure you’ve had your fill of my stink.”

“You’ll have to come down the stairs, to the kitchen. We have an indoor well and a tub in a room just beyond it. I can help you, if you think you can make it.”

“I think I can. I feel heartier than I have since I woke up.” And if Alain looked beneath Breeze’s sheets, he’d see plenty of proof. Probably best to get rid of that before Alain helped him bathe. He struggled to focus on his breakfast and think about anything else. Luckily, Alain helped distract him.

“So, I guessed you were from Espero. I haven’t met many people from the island. How long have you been away?”

“About seven years.”

“You must have been quite young when you left home,” Alain said.

“Yes, I’d just come of age.”

“Why did you leave?”

“Wanted to see the world, I suppose. Don’t you?”

Alain laughed. “No! I have everything I need right here. This land has been in my family for nine generations—almost five hundred years. Since my ancestors accepted this property from the valen of Lockhaven, it’s taken care of us. I love this place. I can’t imagine leaving. Espero wasn’t like that for you?”

“No.” Silence fell between them as Breeze finished his breakfast. He didn’t want to talk about Espero, and it wasn’t anything Alain would be able to comprehend. “You don’t want more for yourself? Something grander? Adventure and glory for your name?” What young man didn’t?

“No. I have no one to prove anything to. I love tending the grapes and the land. The goddesses have blessed us, and I’m thankful. My heart is here.”

Sounds frightfully dull, Breeze thought, if comfortable. “No aspirations at all?”

“Maybe just… someone to share it with. But that won’t happen.” Alain seemed ready say more, but stopped himself and paused before rushing to quantify his statement. “Not anytime soon, at least. I have too much to do to get the vineyard back to where it can support us. Buildings need repaired, and over half of the vines will have to be replanted. I can only pray we’ll be able to harvest enough come Berris’s Moon to produce enough wine to sell next year. What we have to take to market this summer will barely get us by. Too many of the cellars caved in when the support beams burned. Luckily, last year was good, and we’ll fetch a good price for what’s left. And we have the ice wine. I’m sorry. You probably don’t care about any of this.”

To Breeze’s surprise, he found he did, a little, and he caught himself imagining ways to help the vineyard thrive. Not that he knew a thing about it. “What is ice wine?”

“We leave the grapes on the vine until the frost, let them freeze before harvesting. The water in them turns to ice, and it concentrates their sweetness. We press them while they’re still frozen, and it produces the most exquisite wine, as golden as the sunlight, sweet as honey, and with a taste of the mountains and the winter. It can be sold for exorbitant prices; the nobles here in the north adore it. Ice wine is risky, though. First off, if the frost comes too late, we chance letting the grapes rot on the vine and losing an entire crop. Secondly, the frozen grapes produce much less juice than they would if we picked them normally, so of course they produce less wine.”

“That seems the thing to do, then. You might end up with less wine, but you’ll make more gold in the long run, won’t you?”

Alain wiggled his fingers in Breeze’s hand like he wanted to tap them on something as he considered. “Possibly. Not all the grapes will work, though. And there’s a good chance the goddesses and seasons won’t cooperate. We usually only risk a small portion of the grapes for the ice wine, those we can afford to lose. If we made them all into ice wine, we would do quite well, but if we lost them to rot, we’d be doomed.”

“Octavian always tells me destiny smiles on the bold man and ignores the timid.”

“You speak highly of him,” Alain said.

“He’s a good man, as I explained. Shrewd, though. Sharp as a dagger. And, I suppose, he was good to me. Gave me a chance.”

Alain looked at him intently, batting his long golden lashes, so Breeze continued. “He could have turned me away. I wasn’t much of a warrior when I went to join the Roses. But I told him my story, and he told me his, and it turned out they weren’t so different. He gave me a place to belong. Saw some worth in me that no one else ever had. I owe him a great deal.”

“You didn’t feel like you belonged in Espero?”

“No.” Dammit, he didn’t want to talk about this. He pulled loose of Alain’s hand and took a long drink of wine to avoid speaking.

“Why?”

“I just wanted a different life from the one laid out for me there. Same as Octavian. I wanted to make it on my own like he did. He’s not much older than us, you know.”

“He sounds like a remarkable man.” Alain looked like he wanted to say something else, but he busied himself with stacking Breeze’s empty dishes onto the tray. “I suppose we should see to your bath.”

Alain left the tray on the floor next to the bed and helped Breeze to stand. He arranged Breeze’s arm over his shoulders, and Breeze caught his own scent. Goddesses, he really reeked, and he felt suddenly self-conscious.

The trip down the stairs and through the cheery kitchen hurt less than Breeze expected, but by the time they reached the small, whitewashed room at the end of the long corridor, the side of his left thigh trembled and threatened to cramp. Alain helped him to sit on a wooden chair while he filled three metal pails from the pump and suspended them over a raised pit of coals in the corner of the room. Then he picked up a pair of shears. “Oh no. I have to take your bandages off, and you didn’t take your elixir.”

Breeze laughed. “I can hardly wash and shave myself if I’m fast asleep. Or were you planning to do it?”

Alain colored. Goddesses, that was alluring, and Breeze wondered how far the dusky-rose color spread down his neck. Even his lips darkened when he spoke. “I have done it, you know. Bathed you.”

“I know. Thank you. I was only teasing. I did not mean to upset you.”

“I’m not upset. I just don’t like doing this. I know it’s necessary to the healing, but I don’t like seeing you… seeing anyone suffering. I should go back to your room and fetch the tonic.”

“I’d rather do without it,” Breeze said. “I’ve had enough of feeling fuzzy.”

“You really should—”

“Alain, I will be fine. This isn’t the first time I’ve been injured.” He didn’t add that it was by far the worst, or that he wanted to experience what was about to happen without the haze of the elixir.

“I’ll at least go the kitchen and get you more wine to dull the pain.”

He returned with an open bottle, and Breeze drank. Goddesses, this would spoil him. This tasted like wine from Espero, bright and bold with notes of bitter cherry, currant, the black stone Pherara had pulled from the sea to form the island, leather, and tarberry. He almost moaned as it slid down his throat to warm his belly. “Amazing. You made this?”

“It takes a great many people,” Alain said as he emptied the buckets into the round wooden tub.

“But according to your instructions,” Breeze pressed.

“Yes, I suppose.”

“You, my friend, are an artist.”

“Thank you, but that’s hardly the best we have to offer. Just table wine, really.”

“Goddesses.”

“Your bath is ready. I should take your dressings off. Drink some more.”

Breeze didn’t need to be told twice. After a few long pulls, he carefully rolled the loose brown trousers the children had given him to his ankles and lifted his feet out. Aside from the linen strips, he was completely naked. Not that he was shy—at Rosecairn, the men swam together in the summer and helped each other on and off with their armor. Besides, Alain had seen him, so he didn’t bother covering himself. When Alain turned and saw him sitting with his legs open, everything on display, he blushed almost as burgundy as the wine and tossed Breeze a towel.

Breeze chuckled but draped it across his sensitive bits. “I’m sure you’ve seen it.”

“I have seen it,” Alain said a little shortly, “not that I was trying to look, or staring at it, or something. I kept it covered up when I could!”

“I never meant to imply otherwise, friend.” Alain did not like being teased. Breeze was used to the back and forth jibes between the warriors at Rosecairn, and sometimes they grew quite vicious, but he didn’t want to make Alain uncomfortable. “You know me. Not used to the company of civilized men. I apologize.”

 

Buy Link (25% off August 8-12!)

 

So what do you think of Alain and Breeze? Who is your favorite so far?

 

Do you like “opposites attract” storylines—where it takes a while for characters to look past their preconceptions and understand each other?

5 Responses to “Wine and Roses–Character Intro and Excerpt #1”

  1. H.B. says:

    Alain seems like someone easy to care for. He’s coming off a bit uptight and I think it’ll be fun for Breeze to inject some fun into his life and just relax him a bit maybe….opposite attract stories are always fun to read and its always fun to see when a character starts to fall and open up their eyes.

  2. JJ says:

    It’s always interesting to see how the characters in “opposite attract” stories begin to understand and start appreciate each other. I like both characters.
    Although I’m not a drinker, ice wine sounds so delicious.

  3. Susan says:

    As an oenophile, I vote for Alain (besides, I love his French name).

  4. Gus says:

    JJ– Ice wine is really good. Also really expensive. It’s more for tasting than really drinking. People usually only have a few sips after dinner like a dessert. I’ve only ever tried it a few times. A lot of good ice wine comes from Canada.

  5. Gus says:

    Susan–A lot of the fantasy language in that part of the world is based–extremely loosely– on French and a hodgepodge of the other Romance languages, but I’ve taken some major liberties.

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