Time for an excerpt — (Gerry’s Lion)

April 24, 2015

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This is Ashavan Doyon, talking about my new release Gerry’s Lion.

There’s a scene where Leo has discovered that Gerry loves art and goes to the gallery on the Sunrise. He’s trying to learn more about Gerry, and he gets a little more than he bargained for.

Leo thanked him and took the stairs down to deck six. The hallway where the art was displayed wasn’t difficult to find. It was the only one that hadn’t been specifically decked out for the holiday.

Leo walked down hesitantly, looking at the artwork. Most of the names he didn’t recognize. He studied the paintings, wishing he knew anything about the artists or art. He could spot what he liked: bold oil paintings where you could see the texture of the paints. And there were a few. But the ones on the wall were painfully melancholy. Trees about to lose their last leaf. A single leafless birch surrounded by the fiery colors of autumn. They were vivid and almost angry.

“Brilliant, aren’t they?” said a quiet voice behind him.

Leo gulped and nodded.

“They are quite a departure for this artist. He’s known for more modern abstract work. His focus is usually on color and texture as much as content, conveying location and…. Well, he’s brilliant. These were his first works on the market in a couple years. But you can tell it’s him. See the birch, lonely, white, depressed… you can see the bark peeling. Look at how it’s so much more vivid than the brilliant colors of the trees surrounding it.”

“I like the textures,” Leo said, turning to find a well-dressed man in a suit. “I don’t really understand the rest.”

“Perhaps a Christmas-themed piece?”

Leo shook his head. “I’ve met someone. And he’s into art and I like art, but I want to understand it better.”

The attendant smiled. “I’m Nate. I can help you.”

Nate walked him down the hall and stopped at each piece of art. He spoke passionately about the pieces, describing the virtues of each one. Occasionally they’d come to a piece virtually locked to the wall, and Nate would drop a name even Leo couldn’t miss. Rembrandt. Picasso. When they reached the end of the hall, Nate led him into another small room. Leo stood in the doorway, transfixed.

“That’s another Tanner,” said Nate. “It’s the last modern piece he put on the market.”

“It’s pain,” Leo said, starting at the name.

It can’t be.

“You’re close. The title of the piece is Loss.”

Leo looked at the painting, studying it. Making his way through the sweeping strokes to find the objects in the sea of white and pale blues. To make out the figures. The sweep of the strokes conveyed a line. Peaks and valleys fading and then flat. And at the end of it a figure at the door, alone. A hospital room. The painting was a hospital room. An empty bed. A weeping black figure alone.

Choosing character traits for characters can be a struggle for an author. How does one convey a painting if one doesn’t paint? How does one convey the taste of a delicacy? The exhilaration of life on a motorcycle? I tried to pull Leo’s discovery of appreciating the artwork into his feelings for Gerry–important because for Gerry that artwork is very tied into Adam and Gerry’s loss.

Is there something innocuous that you associate with loss? For me it’s a cologne. A whiff can send me spiraling for days.

Sailing on the Sunrise — (Gerry’s Lion)

April 24, 2015

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This is Ashavan Doyon, here talking about the release of Gerry’s Lion.

I have a confession. This story originally started life as a submission for the Advent Calendar. I wrote it in the middle of my vacation in July two years ago. Competition for the advent calendar is really tough, and when it didn’t make it, I was heart broken. I loved the story of Gerry and his lost love Adam. For months it drove me nuts, until I finally just sat down and said to myself, what if this is the middle of the story. And I tried starting the story at Thanksgiving instead. For anyone who thinks this version has too much angst, try to imagine the Gerry that emerged in THAT story.

With Thanksgiving not working, I turned instead to the next holiday–Valentine’s Day. It was here, I think, where Gerry really started to shine again, and the angst balanced out enough to work. But I owe this story, in many ways, to a cruise I took with my long suffering husband, who endured me writing over 17 thousand words on a one week cruise to Bermuda.

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I chose holidays to focus the scenes of this story around because they are moments of glorious potential drama, and that is magnified for many LGBT folks, as there’s additional layers of acceptance or lack thereof with their families. And we see a lot of that nuance in this story – from the angsty Christmas cruise that starts it, to the nervous wrangling of traditions for Valentines Day, to the mystery Easter egg hunt where they hunt for eggs painted brown and hidden in the woods. I actually found focusing on holidays a good way to move the story and also to jump it forward every so often, and I think it helped a lot with pacing the story.

What’s your favorite vacation/holiday story (either personal or in a romance?) I’ll be using the comments to help determine who wins the prizes!

Don’t forget to buy the book: http://www.dreamspinnerpress.com/store/product_info.php?products_id=6305 (or in print) http://www.dreamspinnerpress.com/store/product_info.php?products_id=6306

–> my vacation story: On this infamous cruise, I was in one of the bars on the cruise ship in the middle of the day (it was almost completely empty) when I was approached by one of the other cruisers, who asked what I was doing. I explained that I was an author, writing gay romances. She blithely explained how those were her favorite, while her husband got redder and redder, sure she hadn’t heard me say “gay” romances. To this day I don’t know if she did, but I gave her my card, it would have been hard NOT to tell from that.

About the Cover — (Gerry’s Lion)

April 24, 2015

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This is Ashavan Doyon again, here to talk to you about Gerry’s Lion.

Covers matter, a LOT. Often it is only the cover that first attracts a reader into taking the moments to read the blurb, and so it is an element, I think, that tortures authors. We want a cover that says EVERYTHING there is to say about our story. But it can’t. And if it tries, it can break the conventions of the genre so badly that no one will read it. I’ve seen incredible stories that just didn’t perform as expected, and sometimes I have to wonder if the cover is the reason.

Gerry’s Lion breaks the pattern for my covers with Dreamspinner. All my previous covers have been either photographs or photo montages. This one was drawn, which brought a new element into trying to find the perfect cover. When you submit an art request you give a brief character description, and that’s really almost all the artist has to figure out the best model for the character. They have that and a very brief synopsis. And a brief statement about the dream cover that you most want to see.

I described Leo like this: Leo Ystrabov is on the lower side of average height (about 5’6″), blue eyes, black hair. As a [spoiler redacted], he’s exceptionally well built and muscular. He favors tropical shirts.

And for my dream cover? This is what I asked for: An art gallery… the walls are white, but the room is dark shadows, a light shining on a single piece of art. It was radiant, like the sun. Yellows and reds and oranges, a mane of light around a dark figure, dancing–Gerry, engulfed by his lion. A man is seen from behind looking at the painting – this could be either Gerry, Leo, or the two of them together, all three situations happen in the book [minor spoiler redacted].

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I think I got pretty lucky, that comes really close. My experience has been getting a couple of covers built from watermarked stock images that give an impression of what the cover artist is going for. With a drawn cover it was quite different. I received sketches to show those ideas, and then the one I chose was drawn. Most of my editorial decisions once I’d picked which of the sketches I wanted were limited to how the title would be displayed.

What were the other two drawings? I don’t think I’m allowed to show you but there were two alternates. One depicted Leo, pulling off his shirt, in front of an abstract background of empty frames. The other showed Gerry, with Leo craning his neck over Gerry’s shoulder in front of a row of frames. I confess I had a hard time deciding, in part because Gerry’s character is African-American; I think there’s value in showing that on the cover. Unfortunately the depiction of Gerry just didn’t feel right to me (he was too tall, too muscular, the character didn’t make me think of the Gerry from my story) and I elected to go with the final cover shown here.

What makes a good cover, and what good stories do you think may not have been as popular because of the cover? Don’t forget–Responses will be used to help decide on a winner for one of the e-books I’m giving away!

And before I forget: BUY THE BOOK. PLEASE, PLEASE BUY THE BOOK:

http://www.dreamspinnerpress.com/store/product_info.php?products_id=6305

or in print:

http://www.dreamspinnerpress.com/store/product_info.php?products_id=6306

(in the interests of making people happy: the e-book version is part of the Wet Dream sale from today until 4/28 – 25% off)

Release Day Party — Gerry’s Lion

April 24, 2015

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Greetings Everyone! Welcome to the Release Day Party for Gerry’s Lion!

This novel is my first full length novel with Dreamspinner Press and I’m so thrilled to be able to hold a copy of my work in my hands. Today we’re going to talk a little about the story, I’ll talk about some of my inspiration. In there somewhere I’ll give away some e-books, and I’ll be choosing the winners from folks who respond to my end of post questions in the comments. I love to chat, so feel free to ask me anything!

So first a little more of an in person intro from me:

Gerry’s Lion

Gerald Tanner lost the piece of his life he loved most, his husband Adam. When faced with the prospect of another Christmas with a family who thinks he’s better off now that Adam is gone, Gerry decides instead to revisit the memory of when they met, and boards a Christmas cruise on the Sunrise. He’s not expecting to meet Leo Ystrabov. He certainly never imagined the courageous young man would challenge him into feelings of desire and the possibility of a love that isn’t his precious Adam.

Leo Ystrabov doesn’t quite know how to handle the shattered heart Gerry presents so hesitantly. But the offer is precious, and Leo can’t resist. However, with two families none too eager to accept them and a lot of baggage on both sides, their relationship faces an uphill battle. Leo will have to find his courage to be the lion Gerry sees in him.

I know, sounds a little heavy. There’s a lot of angst in this story for some pretty obvious reasons. So, what attracts you to gay romances? Do your prefer a certain kind? I’m a sucker for a period piece. How about you?

Some Q&A time!

April 22, 2015

This is my first Author Blog and release party, so please bear with the newbie! One of the things they recommended I talk about is some ‘behind-the-scenes’ stuff, such as what I was listening to when I was writing. I don’t generally have any particular type of music that I listen to. I have a playlist called ‘Writer’s Groove” which is such a mish-mash of genres it’s not even funny.  I mean it goes from Justin Timberlake’s ‘Oh No What You Got’ to Vitas’ singing Lucia Di Lammeermore.

I find inspiration in many different places. A Midsummer Dream was actually inspired by a  film adaptation of A Midsummer Night’s Dream with Stanley Tucci as Puck and Christian Bale as Demetrius. Michelle Pfeiffer played Titania and Kevin Klein played the guy who get his head turned into that of an ass. Don’t ask me the character’s name because I can’t remember it for the life of me! Anyway,  A Midsummer Night’s Dream has always been my favorite Shakespearean play. You can’t really ‘rewrite’ the work of the Immortal Bard, so I decided to set the story in a theater and to have the troupe performing an adaptation of the play. Obviously, I needed a way for the two main characters to be put together and what better way than to have the director adapt the play in such a way as to really put them together? Thus, Helena became Helenus.

Here’s your question: What is your favorite Shakespearean play adaptation?

https://www.dreamspinnerpress.com/store/product_info.php?products_id=6298

When Opposites Attract… with Nancy M. Griffis

April 20, 2015

Nancy Griffis

Hello Hello! I’m Nancy M. Griffis and my novel, A Most Unusual Wedding, is out today! I’m very excited to be here talking about my latest release with all of you!

Wedding stems from a short story that was published in a charity anthology a few years ago. It centers around Lord Leo Harris and Master Leathersmith Gerald Smithson and their (if I may say so) adorable love story in an alternate Victorian London where magic, aka power, runs rife through the population. Most things in the book echo the real London of the time but to two major things: the power and same-sex pairings being nothing unusual. If you’ve read A Most Unusual Courtship (the prequel, available FREE at Dreamspinner), then you know why, but if not, back in Greek times, same-sex unions were blessed by the Gods and the world simply never went back on that.

Leo, god love him, is as fine a dandy as you’d ever want to know, and shows it in his extremely colorful wardrobe and rakish sense of humor. But he also has that steel of spine that comes from having gotten everything he’d ever needed. He’s a lord, he’s heir to the family fortune and political power, a middle child of three, and has great powers within himself. He could have turned out an absolute horror, but for a good heart, a lovely family, and incredibly inquisitive mind.

Gerald, on the other hand, is a quiet, sweet man who is as steadfast as the day is long in summer. He’s an only child raised by his grandfather, Daniel, after his parents were killed in a terrorist bombing when he was ten. He’s been significantly hurt by mages in his past and so distrusts them all and refuses to do business with any. The lone exception to this is his best mate, Harry Bickley, who’s away most of the time at sea in Her Majesty’s Navy.

I have a wee excerpt below from Courtship that shows the moment Leo and Gerald meet that I think you’ll enjoy.

A friend asked me how in the hell I came up with the idea for Wedding which cracked me up. It wasn’t that I so much came up with it that Leo started yammering in my ear about getting married. Incessantly. Right while I was in the middle of another project. And because he’s such a brat, he got what he wanted when I put down the other novel and started outlining Wedding. Why yes, all writers are crazy to a certain extent, if you didn’t already know that. ;o) Of course, it couldn’t just be about getting married - that would be far too sweet for one of my books – so I did come up with the plague to slow things down a bit and then, well, someone besides Leo was utterly taken with Gerald (he really is the sweetest man) and things kind of went downhill from there for the poor boys.

***

So here are a couple of questions for you readers out there…

What’s your favorite time period for a magic-based novel? Or for any novel, really. This is my first historical novel and the research was both intimidating and fascinating. I believe I’ve come down with the itch to do more novels in other time periods (not related to Leo & Gerald) but I’m curious if there’s a common zeitgeist time period.

When you read books with magic in them, do you prefer fully spoken spells, spells in other/made up languages, or does it not matter? I posted this question to my flist while writing and am wondering if the world at large echoes their responses. :o

***

Alrighty! I’m going to head out now that I’ve taken up your precious time. I truly hope you enjoy Courtship and Wedding, because I just adore my guys and want everyone to love them. Oh! And in case you’re wondering, I’m hard at work on the sequel, A Most Unusual Honeymoon, (A murder mystery for the guys! wheeee!) and hoping to finish soon so as not to keep you all waiting too long.

Thanks for stopping by! This is Nancy, signing off.

 

***

LEATHER ALWAYS felt and smelled like home. From the time Gerald was a small boy leaning against his father’s knee, he’d been surrounded by the crafting of it. Instead of learning his letters, he’d learned good cuts from bad. Instead of playing with boys outside in the busy London streets, he’d stayed inside and watched every cut his father had chiseled or sliced into. His education had eventually included basic reading and maths, but originally consisted of tanning and cutting and creating works of art from all forms of leather.

All his childhood memories encompassed leather in some form, but the most bittersweet had been witnessing his parents don butter-soft leather cuffs on their tenth anniversary. Gerald had peeked through the stairway rails as firelight cast a golden warmth over the room and his parents kissed gently, the cuffs shining and soft on each right wrist.

His childhood had come to a horrible end two days later when his parents had been caught in the blast of a terror attack on Her Majesty’s Theatre.

“Gerald! You done yet, lad?”

Gerald snapped out of the sad thoughts that were just as heartbreaking sixteen years later. He set down the anniversary cuffs he’d been working on and looked up. His grandfather was still strong enough at eighty-three to bellow from the third story of their London home, as annoying as the habit was. “Almost, Granddad! Be up in a few minutes!”

The shop door opened, jingling the bell above it, and in walked a dandy if ever Gerald had seen one. He had the strong features and perfectly straight teeth that were hallmarks of the gentry. He was handsome, no doubt, with lively blue-gray eyes. The fine cotton trousers, satiny shirt, perfectly creased morning coat, and elegant leather boots certainly completed the portrait of a gentleman. The cluster of red and black plumage on the man’s hat made Gerald want to roll his eyes at the puffery.

Before the man could do more than doff his hat to reveal honey-colored hair and smile in greeting, Gerald said flatly, “I serve no mages in this shop, my lord.”

The man paused, head canting aside as he asked, “How do you know I’m a mage?”

“The door was locked.”

“I see. Well, you don’t even know what I’m going to ask of you.”

“I need not know, my lord, to know that I do not serve your kind.”

“My kind?”

“Arrogant mages with no sense of obligation to pay for what they order.”

“I see.” A smile hovered again over the man’s mouth, and then he said, “So if I were to pay you ahead for the work, would that change your mind?”

“It would not.”

“Not even a little?”

The teasing tone prompted Gerald to frown. “My lord, there are many excellent leathersmiths in London.”

The lord walked closer and spun his hat between his palms. “Ah, but you are the best; everyone says so. I need the best.”

Gerald stood to his considerable height. As expected—like most men—the lord came to Gerald’s shoulders. Those blue eyes widened in surprise as the man craned his neck to look up and meet his gaze. Gerald said firmly, “I serve whom I wish, and those of power do not number among them. Good day, my lord.”

The man’s mouth twisted into a moue of disappointment, and he heaved an overly dramatic sigh. “Well. If you’re going to be petty about it and tar everyone with the same brush, then I’ve no choice but to go elsewhere. At least for now.”

Gerald didn’t reply, instead choosing to sit back down and wait for the man to leave. The man again twirled the hat between his palms and then set it atop his head before leaving. Mayhap it was painting all mages alike, but he’d dealt enough with them in the past to maintain his present loathing.

Untrustworthy sods, all of them.

As soon as the mage closed the door behind him, Gerald stood and walked over to lock the door again, then tugged on it to be certain. He returned to his work counter, packed away the anniversary cuffs, and swiftly tidied up the small shop before jogging upstairs to his grandfather’s apartment on the third floor. He reached the door just as it opened, and he intercepted his grandfather before he could descend a single step. If Daniel walked down three flights of stairs, Gerald might end up carting him back up, depending on Daniel’s mood.

Green eyes twinkled up at him and his grandfather said, “It’s about time you came up, you great lout! Where’s me tea?”

Gerald chuckled, then said, “Where it always is, Granddad, waiting to be made in your kitchen. Settle yourself down on the sofa, and I’ll get it started for you.”

Daniel Smithson hadn’t reached his great age without knowing how to take advantage of any kind of situation. That didn’t preclude him from being an excellent grandfather; it just made Gerald’s life a bit livelier. As the old man had taken him in at the tender age of ten without a single complaint, though, Gerald was more than happy to put up with his machinations.

“Saw a pretty thing leaving the shop just now.”

Except for his matchmaking ones, Gerald thought with a sigh. “He’s a lord and a mage, Granddad. I sent him packing.”

Daniel settled down onto the comfortable sofa with a groan and wagged a finger at him. “You’re too fussy by half, my lad. If a lord like that were t’pay me that sort of attention in my day, I’d have lapped at his silver spoon. I’m not getting any younger, Gerald. You’ll need lookin’ after, once I’m gone, no matter your independent ways. It’s not right, livin’ alone all yer life.”

Gerald set the kettle on to boil, slid the half-eaten meat pie into the oven, and turned the dial to warming. So convenient, these new ovens. A small bit of magic spelled to the item itself—no mages necessary—and baking was no longer a hazardous thing where Gerald could accidentally set the kitchen afire. “I need no looking after, Granddad. And besides which, you’ll outlive us all.”

Daniel cackled a bit. “There is that, my lad, there is that.”

 

***

Nancy M. Griffis: http://www.dreamspinnerpress.com/AuthorArcade/nancy-m-griffis

Buy A Most Unusual Wedding here!

Blog Release Party! A Most Unusual Courtship & A Most Unusual Wedding

April 16, 2015

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Hello again! Nancy here continuing my first ever blog release party for my novel A Most Unusual Wedding (out 4/20/15) and its prequel, the novella A Most Unusual Courtship (out – and free – now)!

One thing that I’ve always found to be helpful while I write is music. I simply can’t write without it! (I mean, okay yes, technically I can, it’s just not nearly as easy nor does it flow as fast) But it’s not just listening to music that completes my writing ritual. I have to wear headphones so the music is concentrated directly to the brain. I think it’s probably a subconscious focusing trick. I ‘blame’ my mother and grandmother for always having music or the television going on in the kitchen when I got home from school and had to do my homework. ;0) There was a lot of noise going on in my house growing up and I got used to it, and now it helps with the creative process.

I’ve found in talking to other authors that it’s 50/50 when it comes to listening to music while writing. Of those who do listen while writing, the genres run the gamut. One of my friends only listens to classical; she feels that having words flying at her while trying to write is too much. Me? I’m often inspired by music and I definitely have “soundtracks” or albums/artists I listen to for different works-in-progress.

For Wedding, I listened to a variety of musicians, but for the majority of writing, I listened to Adele, Arctic Monkeys, and Lifehouse. On one hand, the lyrical quality of Lifehouse and Adele that helped me go back to a quieter time of life. While Victorian London was filled with the everyday noise of life, they obviously didn’t have the same constant background of cars, planes, trucks, radio, television, headphones, elevator music, etc., etc. And on the other hand, with all the crazy shenanigans going on in the novel itself, Arctic Monekys was both BritRock and invigorating, which definitely got me in the mood for the guys.

Novel tidbit: I named Leo’s mother after Adele because I was listening to her when I had to name Leo’s mom. Funny how that works, isn’t it? ;o)

The particular tracks that I just set on repeat and wrote Wedding to:

Adele

He Won’t Go

First Love

Hometown Glory

Rolling in the Deep

Lifehouse

You and Me

Nerve Damage

Broken

Arctic Monkeys

Balaclava

Brick by Brick

I Bet You Look Good on the Dancefloor

Riot Van

I also listen to music when I’m reading so maybe my brain is just wired that way, I don’t know. But how about all of you? If you’re a writer of any sort, do you listen to music while writing? And if you’re a reader, do you need the strains of a familiar ballad going on in the background while you read or must there be a library-esque silence? Taking it a step further, do you find the words fly by in the complete solitude of your fave recliner at home or is a comfy coffee/tea shop more your scene?

Sex, Lies & Cover Art Blues (by @EMLynley)

March 23, 2015

 

Paul Richmond made the striking cover art for this book. He used a photograph by Brazilian photographer Ronaldo Gutierrez, who is the photographer for the wonderful Dirty Dining cover as well.

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It’s tough to choose what the cover should look like. For this book, there wasn’t a particular scene that came to mind, or any symbols from the story, so I decided to go with a photo cover. I selected several, and Paul made mock-ups for me to choose from.

I had trouble making a decision. The other almost-cover is this one.

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I thought the guy’s clothing was enough like a tux to give it a wedding feeling. I let Paul and Elizabeth North make the final decision, and we have the gorgeous guy staring you right in the eye.

Do you think we made the right choice? Which cover do you like best?

What are some of your other favorite Dreamspinner covers? I certainly have a few of my own, but I like hearing which covers readers like, and whether you bought the book because of the cover?

 

Get your own copy of Sex, Lies & Wedding Bells today!  From DreamspinnerFrom AmazonFrom ARe

 Don’t forget to enter my Rafflecopter giveaway

Time To Desert the Desert

March 19, 2015

Well, that about wraps it up for me.The cookies are done and the verdict is…not so good. They spread despite chilling out in the fridge for awhile. Oh, well.

I saw an old travel poster and decided I couldn’t afford to start buying old travel posters, so I recreated it.

I hope you’ve enjoyed a little insight into Something To Die For. It’s available now on Dreamspinner Press, Amazon, and your favorite ebook retailer.

 

Don’t forget to enter for a chance to win a copy! I’m going to be hanging out, answering comments, and looking out for the winner of the giveaway. I’ll make one last post to announce the winner later on, so check back in a few hours or tomorrow to see if you’ve won.  If you are the winner, please comment on my blog and I’ll get back with you.

Please check out Something To Die For by me, Piper Doone. Out now.

Something To Die For

Josh Tucker lives a blessed life—great job, great family, perfect husband, and two wonderful children—but a mysterious man named Adam who haunts his dreams and soon his waking life threatens everything when he stirs doubt as to whether any of it is real. Adam makes Josh question the world he’s taken for granted—as well as the origins of Adam himself.

Even if Adam’s claims are true, Josh has nothing to live for beyond his fabricated life—except the possibility of a real man out there somewhere who can love him. Josh is left with an impossible choice: stay in his delusion where he’s assured some happiness or take a great leap of faith for a chance to make a life with Adam.

 

Thank you.

Call For Backup!! And a Giveaway

March 19, 2015

Calling in for Backup…and a giveaway!

 

As much as this is Josh and Adam’s (and the desert’s) story, there are a number of important secondary characters in  Something To Die For.

 

And I want to talk about them so badly, but in the words of River Song on Doctor Who…spoilers.

 

I can say right off the bat we meet Josh’s husband, Sergio. Sergio is an amazing guy: patient, kind, playful, sexy, and gorgeous. And so not what he seems.

 

Josh and Sergio’s kids, as well as Josh’s mother and siblings, figure heavily in the story as anchors for his sanity. Or do they? Because there are others who show up and throw that idea on its head, leaving Josh to wonder just who is real and who isn’t.

 

Saying too much more would give it all away…so, in that spirit…let’s do a giveaway!

 

In the comments, tell me the most magical, inspirational place you’ve ever been to. The more unusual, the better! This isn’t your typical café in Paris or three weeks in the Alps kind of question. Mostly because I haven’t been on real vacation in over a decade. Well over a decade, actually.

 

If you have photos, show us! Tell everyone about the time you took a wrong turn in Kenosha and ended up almost getting eaten by a moose and you were taken in by a kindly old couple who housed you for a night and you learned to crochet and make maple syrup pie.

 

Winner receives a copy of Something To Die For!

Something To Die For

Josh Tucker lives a blessed life—great job, great family, perfect husband, and two wonderful children—but a mysterious man named Adam who haunts his dreams and soon his waking life threatens everything when he stirs doubt as to whether any of it is real. Adam makes Josh question the world he’s taken for granted—as well as the origins of Adam himself.

Even if Adam’s claims are true, Josh has nothing to live for beyond his fabricated life—except the possibility of a real man out there somewhere who can love him. Josh is left with an impossible choice: stay in his delusion where he’s assured some happiness or take a great leap of faith for a chance to make a life with Adam.