Simultaneous English and German Release of A Kind of Truth by Lane Hayes

December 17, 2015

What made you start writing M/M novels? How long have you been writing, and was it a long process to become a published author?

I’ve been writing to some degree all my life, but I wasn’t serious about it until a few years ago when my eldest son left for college. Before he left, he told my husband and me that he was gay. I was thrilled that he shared this with us.  I had been waiting for him to come out for some time. When he said he wasn’t ready to tell anyone else, I worried about him living away from home at school and not really feeling comfortable in his own skin. Rather than worry about what I couldn’t control, I wrote the story that had been in my head for a while. It became my first book, Better Than Good, which was published in July 2013 by Dreamspinner Press. It’s about a bixsexual man’s journey to accepting himself. And in a way, it’s a love letter to my son asking written in the hopes that he learns to love, accept and be proud of himself.

Complete this sentence: If I weren’t a writer, I would read non-stop!

When you write a book, do you plan it before you start writing or do you let things just develop themselves? Do you work at several books at the same time or do you rather focus on one? 

I have more ideas floating around in my head than I have time to write, but I only work on one book at a time. I usually have a basic plan when I begin writing. I know the general story and where it’s going but I admit, things tend to develop on their own occasionally. J

How do you come up with titles?  

Good question! Sometimes it’s a phrase in the story that strikes me as important. In A Kind Of Truth, you’ll notice the phrase  Kind Of comes up as a means to explain a similarity or to make a comparison. It’s a typical American slang that can be used to downplay emotion or allude to deeper meaning.

Do some protagonists grow dear to your heart more than others? If yes, which are the ones you like best?

Yes! It’s hard to say who my favorites are because yes, to some degree, they’re all my favorites! J I adore Aaron from Better Than Good, Alex from The Right Time, but at this moment, I have to admit I have a huge book crush on Rand O’Malley from A Kind of Truth! He’s sexy, funny and he does what he wants when he wants. The guy has a giant ego but a big heart too!

What character from one of your books would you like to have come alive and be real? Why?

Rand! I’d love to see him in action, onstage singing in a crowded club. People like him fascinate me. I love the idea of the big-mouthed, charismatic person who genuinely wants to make a positive impact. They’re too rare.

Which character do you think most closely resembles your own personality?

I’m more like Will than Rand for sure! I’m not a recluse by any means but I’m quiet. I love music, art and theater, but I don’t necessary want to be onstage. I’m content to observe… and write. J

In January Dreamspinner Press will publish your new novel A Kind of Truth and the German translation Die Wahrheit, die ich meine… on the same day. It’s the first novel which will be released simultaneous with a German translation. What aspect of A Kind of Truth came to you first – the setting, characters, something else?

The setting came first. I love New York City. I visit at least twice a year. I love the energy. It’s one of those places where you really do feel like anything is possible. The city can lift you to unprecedented heights or crush you overnight. It’s a place of dreams. The characters came next. When I was writing Better Than Safe, I introduced Rand as Seth’s best friend. The minute I wrote his name I had a feeling he was the one going to the Big Apple! Lol.

I’m so thrilled A Kind of Truth will be released in German on the same day as it will in the US and UK. It is truly an honor!

What inspired you to write A Kind of Truth? Who is your favorite character to write in this novel?

My frequent trips to NYC inspired me to a degree, but my three children inspired me too. They’re all in their late teens and early twenties and they need to know how important their voice is in the world. Maybe now more than ever. It’s important to dream big and go for it. And to know in your heart you can be anything you want if you work hard enough.

You’ve probably already guessed my favorite character to write. Lol! Rand is dynamic and refreshing. It was fun writing a character who oozes sex and self-confidence!

What part of this novel was the most fun to write and why? What made you struggle the most?

One of my favorite scenes is the trip to the movie theater.  I loved making Rand a little uncomfortable and ultra-aware of Will.  I didn’t struggle with any scene in particular but one of the ending scenes was difficult because it was very emotional. Those scenes are vital and tend to give a glimpse at the MCs when they’re at their most vulnerable, so they need extra care.

If there was one thing you’d like your readers to take away with them from this book, what do you hope it is?

Dream big!  And dream for yourself, not someone else. You can be anything you want if you work for it.

If you had to pick a theme song, what would it be?

That’s a tough one. I’ll say Sympathy for the Devil by the Rolling Stones. When you read the story, you’ll know why. J

Last but not least: What book will be published next, and what are you working on right now?

I’m hoping my next book published will be #2 in this series. I’ve just submitted it to Dreamspinner and I’m now hard at work on #3!

Thank you so much for having me here today! I hope you enjoy A Kind of Truth!

________________

Lane Hayes is a designer by trade who is extremely grateful to be spending more of her time these days doing what she truly loves…writing. She loves chocolate, wine, travel, but most of all, she loves books. Lane’s debut novel, Better Than Good, was a 2013 Rainbow Award finalist. She lives in So.California near the beach with her amazing husband, three teenagers & a gorgeous old Lab named Rex.

If Amy Lane Weren’t a Writer, She’d Be…

November 1, 2015

*This is the English translation of a German interview with Amy Lane*

A big thank you to Amy, who agreed to do this interview and answer the questions of her readers. I also want to thank you, the readers, who came up with the questions and thus made this interview possible.

First of all, name one thing readers would be surprised to know about you. 

I was very surprised to be labeled „the queen of angst“ when I first started out—I would cry as I was writing some parts of my books, but I considered what happened there a very natural part of the plot. On the whole, I’m sort of a snarky, sarcastic person, so I don’t seem like the kind of person who would sit around brewing tea from the tears of my readers.

If you could meet any writer, alive or dead, who would it be and why? 

Jane Austen, of course. I’d like to tell her that the thing that she saw in her tiny corner of the planet was really the big driving machine that ran the world.

What made you start writing M/M novels? How long have you been writing, and was it a long process to become a published author? 

Well, originally I was writing what I thought would be a het vampire romance, and then, as I was writing, I realized my male vampire had been carrying on an affair with a male elf for 150 years prior to the beginning of the story. (Yes—I was surprised too.)  Anyway—I self-published that story, and the subsequent five books that followed, and in every story, M/M seemed to be an organic part of the story. But writing was a hobby, really, until I saw I saw a Tweet from the editor in chief at Dreamspinner Press—it said, „We want to see a fic written to THIS:“ and it featured a very sexy vodka commercial.  I wrote 750 words and sent them in—just for fun—and the response was, „Oh, Amy, we’ve been waiting for you to write for us!“  I hadn’t realized that my self-published work had attracted their attention, but once I’d made contact, there was no going back. Those 750 words eventually became Gambling Men, but by then I’d already written over 10 works for Dreamspinner Press.

Complete this sentence: If I weren’t a writer, I would still be teaching.

I hope this question is not too personal; if yes you of course don’t have to answer it. How do you unite your writing with your private life (family, friends, partner, etc.) without neglecting anyone or anything? 

I don’t. I mean, I try, but housecleaning has become non-existent in my house, and my kids haven’t eaten on the kitchen table in—literally—years. That being said, I attend every soccer game, every dance recital, and talk to the kids to and from school every day. We go out on the weekends and enjoy ourselves, and I try to spend at least an hour every evening at least relaxing with the family. So, it does impact my family interactions, but I do draw the line. My kids will only be young once and I want to spend that time really enjoying their company.

When you write a book, do you plan it before you start writing or do you let things just develop themselves? Do you work at several books at the same time or do you rather focus on one? 

I write one book at a time, from beginning to end, and I usually start with a beginning, middle, and end in mind, and then as I write I fill in the blanks.

What are some of the most awesome/coolest things you’ve learned in the process of research?

KY Jelly has been around since the early 1900ds.

Who or what has influenced your writing, and in what way? 

Well, I taught literature for nearly 20 years—that influenced me in a big way, as did old Harlequin romances and every song I’ve ever heard.

Which novel or series did you enjoy writing the best?

That’s easy—whichever one I’m working on now!

Be totally honest, what’s the most difficult part of being a writer? 

Not eating. I schedule exercise into my week as much as I can—but I am working from my kitchen, and I eat way too much.

What character from one of your books would you like to have come alive and be real? Why?

Green, from my Little Goddess series. Because he rules with kindness, and he’s very wise—but very human. He still makes mistakes.

Which character do you think most closely resembles your own personality?

Auntie Beth from the Triane’s Son books.

If you get the chance to end up in one of your books which would it be? Why? 

The Little Goddess series—because I want to be a ass-kicking sorceress with four amazing lovers!

You’ve just inherited a sheep farm. What do you do now?

Figure out how to turn it into a fiber mill and totally change my vocation.

Have you ever got insulted because of your books? Or have your books ever got insulted? If yes, how did you react to it? And how do you react to negative reviews although it’s obvious the writer just want to do your book poorly? 

My books get insulted all the time—and mostly, I just rant in private to my friends and family, and smile in public. It helps when you accept the fact that not everybody is going to enjoy what you write—that’s a simple fact of life. Some people are mean and horrible about it, and some people simply go, „Not for me.“  I prefer the second approach, but I’m always ready for the first.

Last week DSP published the german translation of Making Promises. It’s the second book of the series Keeping Promise Rock. What part of the novel was the most fun to write and why? What made you struggle the most? 

I loved writing all of this book—but I think the hardest part was making the timelines fit. Some of Making Promises and Keeping Promise Rock were concurrent, and I had to make sure the overlapping parts matched.

Who surprised you the most when you were writing this book, which character had you saying “okay wow! That was unexpected?”

Mikhail—I did not expect to love him nearly as much as I did.  He was snarky and sarcastic and he had such a guarded heart, but once he let Shane in, he was all in. I loved him so much.

Who was the most difficult character to write in this series? And why?

Mikhail—because he was so hurt, and he was going to hurt Shane no matter how I wrote it. I loved that character but he did not make it easy on me.

If you had to pick a theme song for this novel, what would it be?

I think I picked a lot of them. Every chapter title was a song title, if I remember aright.

If there was one thing you’d like your readers to take away with them from this book, what do you hope it is?

You don’t have to shoot bad guys to be a hero. Sometimes being a hero is being the right person for the person you love.

When you began this series did you have a clear vision of how it would begin and end?

No—but by the time I was done with the first book, I did. The last book was exactly as I imagined it.

Can you give your readers any insight as to what we have to look forward to in the rest of the series?

Well, book three is Living Promises, and that’s Jeff and Collin’s book, and book four is Forever Promised, which is sort of a wrap up of all three couples, as well as Andrew and Benny, who give Deacon and Crick a very special gift.

Last but not least: What book will be published next, and what are you working on right now?

Next out from me is a story called Winter Ball, which I love very much, and I’m working on a category romance right now from Dreamspinner Press, called Tamale Boy and the Spoiled Brat.

German Interview with Anna Martin

July 9, 2015

Ich bedanke mich herzlich bei Anna Martin, die sich bereit erklärt hat, an diesem Interview teilzunehmen und euch Lesern Frage und Antwort zu stehen. Auch ein großes Dankeschön an euch Leser, denn ohne euch wäre dieses wunderbare Interview nicht zustande gekommen.

AnotherWayDE

Vielen Dank fürs Übersetzen, Corina! Obwohl ich ein wenig Deutsch in der Schule lernte, erinnert sich mein kleines Spatzenhirn nur mehr an folgende Phrasen: „Ich bin 12 Jahre alt.“ und „Es ist windig.“ Beide Sätze sind mir heutzutage nicht gerade hilfreich.

Zuallererst: Verrate etwas über dich, das deine Leser überraschen würde.

Ich habe einen Master in Stage Management and Technical Theatre (Anm.: wäre in Deutschland der Veranstaltungstechniker), woraufhin ich eine qualifizierte Elektrikerin wurde. An einem Punkt musste ich mich entweder für meine Karriere im Theater oder für meine Karriere als Autorin entscheiden, da beide am Siedepunkt zum Erfolg standen. Ich arbeitete die letzten sieben Jahre beim Edinburgh Fringe Festival (was eines der größten Theaterfestspiele der Welt ist) , sodass ich meine Fähigkeiten hin und wieder aus der Versenkung holen konnte. Obwohl ich das Theater liebe, bin ich doch der Meinung, dass ich die richtige Entscheidung getroffen habe. ;-)

Was hat dich dazu gebracht, M/M Romanzen zu schreiben? Wie lange schreibst du schon und wie lange hat es gebraucht, bis du von einem Verlag publiziert wurdest?

Vor 13 Jahren wurde ich mittels Fanfiktions auf M/M Geschichten aufmerksam. Ich begann, für mich „fehlende Szenen“ im Harry Potter Fandom zu schreiben, die sich dann zu Harry / Draco Geschichten entwickelten, und der Rest ist Geschichte, denke ich! Seit meiner Kindheit erfinde ich Geschichten, aber jetzt schreibe ich sie auch nieder.

Ich war nie in der Lage rauszufinden, was mich so an M/M Romanzen fasziniert. Ich denke, es kann damit zusammenhängen, dass es scheint, als gäbe es hier so viele unerforschte Wege. Wenn ich ein Konzept für eine M/M Geschichte entwickelt habe, kann ich mir ziemlich sicher sein, dass es nicht schon mal geschrieben wurde, und wenn doch, dass ich einen neuen Twist reinbringen kann.

Ich war so glücklich, als „Andere Wege“ veröffentlicht wurde. Eine Freundin von mir, Tia Fielding, veröffentlichte bereits über Dreamspinner Press und schlug vor, das Buch bei ihnen einzureichen. Und sie nahmen es! Vier Jahre und fünfzehn Bücher später stehen wir hier.

Ich hoffe, die Frage ist nicht zu privat, wenn ja, musst du natürlich nicht darauf antworten: Wie vereinst du deine Liebe zum Schreiben mit deinem Real Life (Familie, Freunden, dem Partner etc.), ohne dass einer dabei zu kurz kommt?

Ich habe keine Freunde.

Ha!

Nun, ich habe einen Vollzeitjob im Marketing, weshalb mein Schreiben sich dem anpassen muss. Aber ich bin auch irgendwie ein Glückspilz, da ich ziemlich schnell schreibe. Ich schrieb „Summer Son“ in fünf Wochen und „That I Should Meet a Prince“ (die englische Version wird dieses Jahr veröffentlicht) in neun Wochen.

Ich bin auch Single, kinderlos und lebe allein, das hilft vermutlich!

Es kam mir nie so vor, als würde ich mit mir selbst in einem Konflikt stehen, um mein Verlangen nach dem Schreiben zu stillen, Erfolg in meinem Beruf zu habe und Zeit für meine Freunde zu finden. Ich bin eine wirklich glückliche Frau.

Schreibst du an mehreren Büchern gleichzeitig oder konzentrierst du dich lieber nur auf eines? Wie lange schreibst du durchschnittlich an einer Geschichte und wie sieht dein Schreiballtag im Allgemeinen aus?

Ich habe keine eindeutige Antwort darauf. Manchmal arbeite ich an zwei oder drei Büchern gleichzeitig. Manchmal an einem oder gar keinem. Ich habe eines in einem Monat geschrieben und an einem anderen arbeite ich bereits seit zwei Jahren. Ich habe keine Routine. Das was einer Routine am Nähesten kommt, ist, dass ich abends schreibe, wegen dieses verflixten Vollzeitjobs und da ich meine Geschichten in Coffee Shops überarbeite, um nicht von Tumblr abgelenkt zu werden. Aber es hängt wirklich von vielen verschiedenen Faktoren ab. (Manchmal wünsche ich mir, ich wäre eine jener Autoren, die jeden Morgen 5000 Wörter schreiben, dabei die Katze im Schoß und eine Tasse Kaffee in der Hand haben. Dann hätte ich eine bessere Antwort auf diese Frage! Aber ich denke nicht, dass ich jemals diese Art von Mädchen sein werde.)

Gibt es bestimmte Stärken und Schwächen, die du als Autor besitzt?

Ich denke, sie sind dieselben Dinge. Ich schreibe sehr charakterbezogene Geschichten. Ich bin an den Leben normaler Leute interessiert und was ihre Routinen stört, was sie dazu bringen könnte, sich außerhalb ihrer Wohlfühlzonen zu bewegen, was ausschlaggebend ist, dass sie sich verlieben. Ich schreibe keine Geschichten mit komplexen Handlungen und Nebenhandlungen, mit Schießereine und Werwölfen und Explosionen und überraschenden Schwangerschaften … so bin ich einfach nicht.

Das wohl häufigste negative Feedback zu meinen Geschichten ist, dass nichts darin passieren würde! Und dagegen ist nichts einzuwenden. Gebt mir zwei interessante Jungs und eine ungewöhnliche Situation – das bringt mich auf Touren.

Gibt es für dich gewisse Hilfsmittel oder Werkzeuge, die für einen Autor unerlässlich sind?

Eine gute Vorstellungskraft. Lasst mich euch was witziges erzählen – meine Universität weigerte sich, mich an dem Kurs Kreatives Schreiben teilnehmen zu lassen, da ich nicht die passenden Qualifikationen hätte. Stattdessen wählte ich Englische Literatur. Ich promovierte mit 21, meine erste Geschichte wurde veröffentlicht, als ich 25 war. Qualifikationen sind nicht alles! Ich denke, wenn du das Verlangen hast, zu schreiben, übe, lass dir Feedback geben, lerne deine eigene Arbeit zu editieren und schreibe weiter. Alles was du tun musst, um ein Autor zu werden, ist zu schreiben. So simpel ist das.

Wie hast du die Veröffentlichung deines ersten Buches gefeiert?

Mit einem Tattoo! Ich habe eine traditionelle Zigeunerlady auf meinem Schenkel, darunter ist ein Banner mit dem Spruch „alis volat propriis“. Es ist lateinisch für „Sie fliegt mit ihren eigenen Flügeln.“ Es soll mich daran erinnern, Dinge auf meine Weise zu tun und mich von niemanden zurückhalten zu lassen.

 Findest du einen speziellen Typ Mann besonders faszinierend und bindest du ihn häufiger in deine Geschichten ein?

Ich liebe freche Charaktere. Ich habe einige große, dreiste Persönlichkeiten in meiner Backlist. Meine Protagonisten sind eigentlich so ziemlich das absolute Gegenteil zu den Männern, die ich im realen Leben attraktiv finde. Ich könnte Männer wie Liam von „Solitude“ immer wieder schreiben. Er ist unverschämt und zickig und ein wenig böse, aber ich vergöttere ihn! Ich denke, der einzige Charakter, der meinen perfekten Typ Mann widerspiegelt, ist Ryan von „Cricket“.

 Gehörst du auch zu den Autoren, die von der Muse ständig Arschtritte bekommen, vor allem, wenn sie etwas will, das dir aktuell so gar nicht in den Zeitplan passt?

Ich habe viele Ideen, ja. Ich lasse mich von Leuten inspirieren, da ich mir oft vorstelle: „Okay, welche Art von Person wäre wohl in dieser Situation am interessantesten zu schreiben?“ Wenn ich einen engen Zeitrahmen habe, möchte die Muse normalerweise immer, dass ich eine Fanfiktion schreibe!

Wachsen dir manche Protagonisten mehr ans Herz als andere? Wenn ja, welche magst du am liebsten? Gab es ein Paar, das dich in den Wahnsinn getrieben hat?

Oh Gott, ja. Will und Jesse von der Serie „Neue Wege“. Ich träume von ihnen, und sie sind die einzigen meiner Charaktere von denen ich träume. Ich weiß so vieles über sie. Dinge, die es niemals in die Bücher schaffen würden, da sie zu trivial sind. Ich weiß sogar wie sie sterben, da ich meine Gedanken dorthin wandern lies, um es unbedingt herauszufinden. (Ich weinte danach.) Es gibt sogar ein Pärchen im realen Leben, die für mich Will und Jesse sind – Ich sah ein Foto auf Tumblr und hatte eine Art Nervenzusammenbruch, da es meine Jungs waren, die mir entgegenblickten. Ihre Ausdrücke, die Art und Weise wie sie miteinander umgehen, alles war so, wie ich es mir bei Will und Jesse vorgestellt habe.

Wenn du mit einem deiner Protagonisten einen trinken gehen könntest, für wen würdest du dich entscheiden und warum?

Ich würde sagen, Boner von „Jurassic Heart“. Denn er ist lustig, verrück und wild, und seien wir mal ehrlich, ich würde wohl mit ihm Bett landen.

Welcher deiner Charaktere ähnelt dir charakterlich am meisten?

Ich sagte immer Robert von „Tattoos & Teacups“ (Anm.: deutsche Übersetzung: Teeträume vom Cursed Verlag), da er zu dieser Zeit meiner eigenen Persönlichkeit sehr nah kam. Seitdem hat sich viel geändert, und ich sehe viel von mir selbst in George von „That I Should Meet a Prince“. Deshalb lautet meine neue Antwort George!

Hast du schon einmal abfällige / beleidigende Bemerkungen zu deinen Büchern erhalten? Wenn ja, wie hast du darauf reagiert?

Immer wieder, das gehört dazu, wenn man ein Autor ist. Ich denke, es half mir, dass ich vorher Fanfiktions schrieb, da ich konstruktive Kritik gewöhnt war und meine Arbeit aufgrund dieses Feedbacks stetig verbesserte. Eines meiner liebsten Reviews war ziemlich negativ: „Hab kein Interesse daran, eine schwule Version von Eiskalte Engel zu lesen, die mit selbstverliebten, völlig bescheuerten und verrückten Teenagern besiedelt ist. Ich bin zu alt für diesen Scheiß!“ Das war ein Review zu „Les faits accomplis“. Ich las es und dachte mir: „JA! Ganz genau!“ Die Leserin hat perfekt zusammengefasst, worüber das Buch handelt. Wenn das nichts für sie ist, ist das vollkommen in Ordnung. Aber sie erfasste den Kern der Geschichte in ihrem Statement, und das liebte ich!

Letzte Woche veröffentliche DSP die deutsche Übersetzung von deinem Buch Another Way (Andere Wege). Was hat dich inspiriert, dieses Buch zu schreiben?

Nun, es hat lange gedauert, ehe die deutsche Übersetzung des Buches veröffentlicht wurde. Ich habe es vor sechs Jahren geschrieben, weshalb ich mich nicht mehr wirklich daran erinnern kann, was mich dazu brachte, dieses Buch zu schreiben. Es sind aber auf jeden Fall die Charaktere, die mich immer wieder zu dieser Serie hinziehen – ich vergöttere Jesse und Will, sie fühlen sich so real an und anscheinend kann ich die beiden einfach nicht gehen lassen.

Gibt es eine Szene im Buch, die dich während des Schreibens besonders berührte?

Ich denke, es ist die erste Szene von Buch 3 („To Say I Love You“). Jesse joggt und versucht seine Gedanken zu ordnen. Symbolisch läuft er vor seinen Problemen davon, da er einfach nicht weiß, wie er mit den Dingen, die gerade in seinem Leben geschehen, umgehen soll. Da es aber sehr viele emotionale Hochs und Tiefs in dieser Serie gibt, bin ich mir sicher, dass mir manche Leser widersprechen werden.

Was war der am schwersten zu schreibende Charakter in der Neue Wege Serie?

Ich würde sagen, Jesses Dad. Er ist ein sehr ruhiger, engstirniger, introvertierter Mann, und er kann seine Liebe nur sehr schwer zeigen. Deshalb war es auch so schwer, eine offene Kommunikation zwischen ihm und Jesse zu schreiben! Ich mag ihn trotzdem – obwohl er aus den südlichen USA kommt, akzeptiert er Jesses und Wills Beziehung und verteidigt sie vor seinen homophoben Kollegen.

Wenn du einen Titelsong für dein Buch aussuchen müsstest, welcher wäre es?

Das ist leicht! „Forever“ von Ben Harper. Ich dachte, ich hätte ein Zitat von diesem Lied in einem der Bücher dieser Serie erwähnt, aber ich hab es gerade geprüft und anscheinend war dem nicht so. Das Lied „Walk Away“, auch von Ben Harper, hat den ersten Band dieser Serie sehr beeinflusst.

Am 22. Juni wurde dein Buch Devil’s Food at Dusk veröffentlicht, das aus einer Zusammenarbeit mit M.J. O’Shea entstand. Kannst du uns ein wenig darüber erzählen?

Oh, es machte so viel Spaß, diese Bücher zu schreiben. Es ist der dritte Band einer dreibändigen Kollektion, die wir „Just Desserts“ nennen. Die drei Bücher sind „Macarons at Midnight“, das in einer Bäckerei im West Village in New York spielt, „Souffles at Sunrise“, die über eine Reality Backshow in LA handelt, und „Devil’s Food at Dusk“, das in einem kleinen Kaffee im French Quarter von New Orleans spielt. Jedes Buch hat seinen eigenen Standort und seine eigenen Charaktere, aber sie alle verlieben sich und backen, und es gibt auch ein paar tolle Rezepte in den Büchern! MJ ist eine gute Freundin von mir, weshalb das Schreiben mit ihr fantastisch war.

Sind weitere Reihen oder Einzelbände in dem Genre BDSM geplant?

Ja, plane ich. Ich habe geplant, dass die Serie „Neue Wege“ fünf Bücher beinhaltet. Es wird ein weiteres Buch aus der Sicht von Jesse geben, dann eine Fortsetzung aus Wills Sicht. Ich habe fest beabsichtigt, diese Bücher zu schreiben, aber ich habe keine Ahnung, wann das genau sein wird. Mein Leben als Autor und auch darüber hinaus, ist zur Zeit sehr stressig.

Was fiel dir in deinem letzten Buch am schwersten?

Ich bin mir nicht sicher. Für mich ist es meist am schwierigsten über die fünfzehn- bis zwanzigtausend Wörter hinauszukommen und das ganze Wirrwarr an Ideen in eine schlüssige Geschichte zu bringen. Ich beginne meist mit einem Buch, lasse es dann für eine Weile ruhen, arbeite wieder daran und beende es dann.

Zu guter Letzt. Woran arbeitest du zur Zeit?

Zur Zeit an nichts Solidem. Ich versuche mir gerade selbst beizubringen, ein Drehbuch zu schreiben, und nage an „The Impossible Boy“ – das ist das Buch, an dem ich bereits seit zwei Jahren schreibe. Ich habe ein paar andere Plot Bunnies, aber ich weiß noch nicht, welches davon mein nächstes Projekt sein wird.

Ein großes Dankeschön an alle, die diese Fragen eingeschickt haben. Ich hoffe, ihr genießt die deutsche Übersetzung von „Andere Wege“ und all die anderen fantastischen deutschen Übersetzungen von Dreamspinner Press.

BDSM and Character Driven Romance with Anna Martin

July 9, 2015

A big thank you to Anna Martin, who agreed to do this interview and answer the questions of her readers. I also want to thank you, the readers, who came up with the questions and thus made this interview possible.

AnotherWay

Thank you Corina for translating for me! Although I studied some German at school the only phrases my tiny brain has retained are “Ich bin 12 jahre alt”  and “Es is windig.” Neither of which have been particularly useful to me as an adult.

First of all, name one thing readers would be surprised to know about you.

I did a post-graduate degree in Stage Management and Technical Theatre, and as part of that I became a qualified electrician. At one point I had to make a choice between my career in theatre and my career as a writer, because both were simmering on the verge of being successful. I’ve worked at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival (which is one of the biggest theatre festivals in the world) for the past 7 years, so I still get to dust off those skills every now and again. Even though I love the theatre I think I made the right choice! ;)

What made you start writing M/M novels? How long have you been writing, and was it a long process to become a published author?

I was introduced to M/M via fan fiction about thirteen years ago. I started writing Harry Potter ‘missing scene’ fan fiction stories, and that spiraled to Harry/Draco stories, and the rest is history I suppose! I’ve been making up stories since I was a little kid, these days I just write them down.

I’ve never been able to figure out what the draw of M/M romance is to me. I think it might have something to do with how it seems like there are so many unexplored avenues. If I come up with a concept for a M/M story, I can be fairly certain it hasn’t been done before, or if it has, I can put a new twist on it.

I was incredibly fortunate with getting ‘Another Way’ published. A dear friend of mine, Tia Fielding, was already published with Dreamspinner Press and suggested I submit the novel to them. And they took it! Four years and fifteen novels later, and here we are.

I hope this question is not too personal; if yes you of course don’t have to answer it. How do you unite your writing with your private life (family, friends, partner, etc.) without neglecting anyone or anything?

I don’t have any friends.

Ha!

Well, I have a full time job in marketing, so my writing life has to fit in and around that. In a way I’m lucky, because I write fairly quickly. I wrote ‘Summer Son’ in five weeks and ‘That I Should Meet a Prince’ (which is coming out in English later this year) in about nine weeks.

I’m also single, childless, and live on my own, so that probably helps!

I’ve never felt like I was at war with myself, trying to fulfill my desire to write and earn a living at my day job and make time for my friends. I’m a very lucky person.

Do you work at several books at the same time or do you rather focus on one?  How long does it take you on average to write a story and what does your daily writing routine look like?

I don’t have an answer to this. Sometimes I’m working on two or even three books at a time. Sometimes it’s one or none. I’ve written a book in a month and I’ve been working on one for almost two years. I don’t have a routine at all. I suppose the closest thing I have to a routine is writing in the evenings, because of that darned day job, and editing in coffee shops where I can’t be distracted by tumblr. But it really depends on a lot of different factors. (Sometimes I wish I was one of those writers who writes five thousand words every morning with her cat at her feet and a mug of coffee at her elbow, then carries on with her day. Then I’d have a better answer to this question! But I don’t think I’ll ever be that girl.)

What would you say are your strengths and weaknesses as an author?

I think they’re the same thing, actually. I write very character-driven novels. I am interested in the lives of normal people and what upsets their routines, what makes them step outside of their comfort zones, what makes them fall in love. I don’t write stories with complex plots and sub-plots and gunfights and werewolves and explosions and surprise pregnancies… it’s just not who I am.

Probably the most consistent negative feedback I get on my novels is “nothing ever happens!!!” and that’s fair. Give me two interesting guys and an unusual situation any day — that’s what makes me tick.

What tools do you feel are must-haves for writers?

A good imagination. Here’s a fun story – my university refused to let me take a Creative Writing degree because I didn’t have the right qualifications. Instead I took English Literature. I graduated aged 21, and had my first novel published at 25. So qualifications aren’t everything! I think if you’ve got the desire to write, then practice get feedback, learn how to edit your own work, and write some more. All you have to do to be a writer is write. It’s that simple.

How did you celebrate the sale of your first book?

With a tattoo! I have a traditional gypsy lady on my thigh with ‘alis volat propriis’ on a banner underneath – it’s Latin for ‘she flies with her own wings’. It was my reminder to myself to do things my way and not let anything hold me back.

Is there any specific type of man that fascinates you more than others? If yes, do you often tend to use that type in your stories?

I love bold characters. I’ve got quite a few big, brash personalities in my backlist! The men I’m drawn to writing are actually quite different to the men I’m attracted to in real life. I could write men like Liam from ‘Solitude’ forever. He’s sassy and bitchy and a little bit mean, and I adore him! I think the only time I’ve ever written a character who is my perfect ‘type’ of man is Ryan from ‘Cricket’.

Are you one of the authors that get kicked by their muse all of the time, especially when she wants something that doesn’t really fit into your writing timetable in that situation?

I have a lot of ideas, yeah. I get inspired by people, by thinking ‘okay, so what sort of person would be really interesting to write in this situation?’ Generally when I’m working to a tight timescale my muse wants me to write fan fiction!!

Do some protagonists grow dear to your heart more than others? If yes, which are the ones you like best?

Oh, God, yes. Will and Jesse from the Another Way series. I dream about them, and they’re the only characters I’ve ever written that I dream about. I know so, so much about them. Stuff that would never make it into the books because it’s so trivial. I also know how they die, because I had to let my mind go there and find out. (I cried a lot afterwards.) There’s also a real-life couple out there who I see as Will and Jesse – I saw a picture of them on tumblr and had something of a nervous breakdown because it was my boys looking back at me. Their expressions, the way they connected to each other, everything was just how I imagine Will and Jesse to be.

If you could have a drink with any of your book’s fictional character who would it be? Why?

I’m going to say Boner from ‘Jurassic Heart’. Because he’s fun and crazy and wild and let’s face it, I’d probably end up in bed with him.

Which character do you think most closely resembles your own personality?

I always used to say Robert from ‘Tattoos & Teacups’, because at the time he was very much a reflection of me. I’ve changed quite a lot since then though, and I ended up pouring a lot of myself into George from ‘That I Should Meet a Prince’. So my new answer to this question is George!

Have you ever got insulted because of your books? Or have your books ever got insulted? If yes, how did you react to it?

All the time, it’s part of being a writer. I think this is where my background in fan fiction has helped me a lot, actually, because I’m used to constructive criticism and amending my work  based on feedback. One of my favourite reviews ever was fairly negative: “No desire to read a gay Cruel Intentions populated with self indulged batshit crazy teenagers. I’m way too old for this shit.“ – this was for ‘Les faits accomplis’. I read it and just thought “Yes!! Exactly!” The reader just perfectly summed up what the book is about. If it’s not for her then that’s absolutely fine. But she captured the essence of the book with that statement, and I love it.

Last week DSP published the german translation of Another Way. What inspired you to write this novel?

Well, it’s taken a while to get the German translation of this book; I wrote it originally about six years ago! So I can’t quite remember exactly what made me want to write the book at first. It’s definitely the characters that keep me coming back to the series though – I completely adore Jesse and Will, they feel very real to me and I don’t seem to be able to leave them alone.

What was the most touching scene to write in this series?

I think it’s probably the opening scene of book 3 (‘To Say I Love You’). Jesse is jogging and going over stuff in his mind. He’s literally running away from his problems because he doesn’t know how to cope with what’s going on in his life. There’s quite a lot of emotional highs and lows in the series though, so I’m sure some of my readers will disagree with me!

Who was the most difficult character to write in the Another Way series?

I’m going to say Jesse’s dad. He’s a very quiet, insular, introverted sort of person, and he doesn’t show affection very well. So trying to write any sort of open communication between him and Jesse is difficult! I like him though – despite being from the southern US he’s very okay with Jesse and Will’s relationship and defends them from his homophobic peers.

If you had to pick a theme song for the series, what would it be?

This one is easy! ‘Forever’ by Ben Harper. I thought I’d used a quote from this song in the front of one of the books from the series, but I’ve just checked and apparently not! The song ‘Walk Away’, also by Ben Harper, was very influential on the first book.

Your novel Devil‘s Food at Dusk, a collaboration with M.J. O’Shea,  was released on 22 June. Can you tell us a little bit about it?

Oh, those books were so much fun. It’s the third book in a three-part collection we called ‘Just Desserts’. The three books are ‘Macarons at Midnight’, which is set in a bakery in the West Village in New York, ‘Souffles at Sunrise’, which is all about a reality TV baking show in LA, and ‘Devil’s Food at Dusk’, set in a tiny café in New Orleans’ French Quarter. Each book has its own location and set of characters, but they’re all about falling in love and baking and there’s some great recipes in the books too! MJ is a great friend of mine so getting to write with her was fantastic.

Are you planning to write more series or novels dealing with BDSM?  

The short answer is yes. I originally planned for Another Way to be a five part series. There’s one more book from Jesse’s POV, then a prequel told from Will’s POV. I have every intention of writing these books but I have absolutely no idea when I’ll have chance to do so. My life both as a writer and beyond is very busy at the moment!

What was the hardest thing about writing your latest book?

I’m really not sure. Usually for me the hardest point is getting past 15-20 thousand words and turning a whole jumble of ideas into a coherent story. I tend to start writing a book, then abandon it, then come back and finish it!

Last but not least: What are you currently working?

Nothing solid at the moment, actually. I’m currently teaching myself how to write a screenplay and I’m still chipping away at ‘The Impossible Boy’, which is a novel I’ve been working on for about two years at this point. I’ve got a few other “plot bunnies” but I’m not sure which one will turn into my next project!

Thank you to everyone who sent in questions – I hope you enjoy the German translation of Andere Wege and all the other fantastic German language titles from Dreamspinner Press.

German Interview with Mary Calmes

July 5, 2015

Ich bedanke mich herzlich bei Mary Calmes, die sich bereit erklärt hat, an diesem Interview teilzunehmen und euch Lesern Frage und Antwort zu stehen. Auch ein großes Dankeschön an euch Leser, denn ohne euch wäre dieses wunderbare Interview nicht zustande gekommen.

Ich möchte allen für diese fabelhaften Fragen danken, und auch der reizenden Corina, die dieses Interview ermöglichte.

Zuallererst: Verrate etwas über dich, das deine Leser überraschen würde.

Ich kann nicht kochen, nicht mal ein bisschen. Rhys Ford kam mal zu mir und versuchte mir zu helfen, gab dann aber auf und kochte selbst für meine Familie. Sie wollten nicht, dass sie wieder nach Hause fuhr.

Findest du neben dem Schreiben noch Zeit, um zu lesen? Was sind deine Lieblingsbücher, die du immer wieder lesen könntest?

Ich lese Liebesromane immer und immer wieder, manchmal alte, mit schottischen Hochlands-Gutsherren und errötenden, jungfräulichen englischen Bräuten, aber seit ein paar Jahren lese ich meist Sachliteratur oder schwule Romanzen. Ich habe ein paar Lieblingsbücher, die ich schon sehr oft gelesen habe, wie Sinner’s Gin von Rhys Ford oder Dex In Blue von Amy Lane, Under The Skin von Bennet und Tachna, Hitzkopf von Damon Suede, und viele, viele mehr.

 Was hat dich dazu gebracht, M/M Romanzen zu schreiben? Wie lange schreibst du schon und wie lange hat es gebraucht, bis du von einem Verlag publiziert wurdest?

Ich wusste bereits mit 12 Jahren, dass ich eine Autorin sein möchte, und da begann ich zu schreiben, aber erst später wurde mir bewusst, dass ich Romanzen schaffen möchte. Die Welt kann ein erschreckender, dunkler Ort sein, und Romantik beruhigt die Seele. Deshalb fing ich an, die traditionelle Junge trifft Mädchen Dynamik zu schreiben, aber alles fühlte sich platt an. Es gab kein Gefühl dahinter und es wirkte, als hätten diese Geschichten kein Leben in sich. Während dieser Zeit las ich The Catch Trap von Marion Zimmer Bradley, die einen tief greifenden Effekt auf mich hatte – dort gab es Glück. Es war ein langer Weg bis dorthin, aber ich liebte es so sehr. Dann las ich What Love Means to You People von Nancy Kay Shapiro. Das war ein weiterer langer und schmerzhafter Weg, aber es gab ein schönes Ende. Ich war begeistert und entschied, dass es genau das war, was ich schreiben wollte.

Als ich meine erste Geschichte beendet hatte, was A Matter of Time war, tat ich das, was ich dachte, was man tun sollte, und suchte nach einen Agenten. Ich sendete Anfragen, aber niemand wollte etwas mit Jory zu tun haben. Erst da begriff ich, dass eine traditionelle Veröffentlichung, Agent zu Herausgeber zu Barnes & Noble, bei mir nicht funktionieren würde. E-Books wurden zu der Zeit gerade angesagt, deshalb entschied ich, einen Verlag zu finden und den digitalen Weg zu gehen. Vor Dreamspinner war ich bei einem für mich falschen Verlag, deshalb mein Rat an euch: Recherchiert immer. Mein erster Verlag war in keinem Weg passend für mich, deshalb entschied ich mich, als ich Wandel des Herzens fertiggeschrieben hatte, nach einem neuen Verlag zu suchen und fand Dreamspinner. Und ich bin noch immer glücklich mit dieser Entscheidung.

Ich hoffe, die Frage ist nicht zu privat, wenn ja, musst du natürlich nicht darauf antworten: Wie vereinst du deine Liebe zum Schreiben mit deinem Real Life (Familie, Freunden, dem Partner etc.), ohne dass einer dabei zu kurz kommt?

Das kann ich nicht, obwohl ich es mir wünsche. Ich bin schrecklich, darin eine Balance zwischen Arbeit und meiner Familie zu finden, und als mein Sohn vier war, sagte er, dass seine Mommy nicht mit ihm spielen könnte, da sie die Knöpfe drücken müsste. Das brach mir mein Herz. Aber mit dem Schreiben versorge ich meine Familie, also ist es das klassische Dilemma. Mein Ehemann ist sehr unterstützend und auch sehr stolz auf mich, aber manchmal bekomme ich trotzdem das “Wenn deine Deadline nicht nah ist, bewegst du deinen Hintern raus und isst mit uns zu Abend”-Ultimatum zu hören. Ich weiß, dass ich eigentlich einen Weg finden sollte, um eine gute Balance zu schaffen, aber meine Fähigkeit für Zeitmanagement ist einfach nur miserable.

Legst du dir schon einen Plot (mit vorgegebenen Situationen) zurecht bzw. weißt du schon zu Beginn wie deine Protagonisten gestrickt sind, oder agierst du während des Schreibens spontan?

Es gibt Leute, die ihren Plot ausarbeiten und andere, die einfach drauf losschreiben, und es gibt Autoren, die ein bisschen von beidem sind. Ich schreibe NUR drauf los. Ich wünschte, ich könnte schon vorher meinen Plot ausarbeiten, aber normalerweise gebe ich meinen Charakteren ihre Namen und beginne mit dem Schreiben und hoffe, dass ich mir dann über die Geschichte klar werde. Ich meine, ich habe eine Idee, wie z. B. wo die Charaktere gerade stehen und wo ich sie am Ende des Buches haben will. Aber darüber hinaus, entscheide ich alles während des Schreibprozesses.

Schreibst du an mehreren Büchern gleichzeitig oder konzentrierst du dich lieber nur auf eines?

Ich schreibe normalerweise an mehreren gleichzeitig, aber da meine Deadlines neuerdings so knapp sind, kann ich mir den Luxus, an zwei Geschichten auf einmal zu arbeiten, nicht leisten. Ich bevorzuge es aber an zwei Büchern gleichzeitig zu schreiben, denn falls es bei einer Geschichte schleppend vorangeht, kann man sich auf die andere konzentrieren.

Wie lange schreibst du durchschnittlich an einer Geschichte und wie sieht dein Schreiballtag im Allgemeinen aus?

Es kommt drauf an. Ich hätte gern, dass ich zwei Monate brauche, um ein Buch zu schreiben, aber zur Zeit brauche ich durchschnittlich einen Monat, aber das ist ein wenig schnell für mich. Ich würde mich besser fühlen, wenn ich für ein Buch zwei Monate Zeit hätte und für eine Kurzgeschichte einen Monat. Ich bevorzuge ein gemächliches Tempo. Je schneller ich etwas schreibe, umso länger braucht die Überarbeitung. Wenn ich länger an einem Buch schreibe, ist die Überarbeitungszeit kürzer, was Sinn macht, da man weniger ausbessern muss.

Welches Buch oder welche Serie hast du am liebsten geschrieben? Hat dir eines deiner Bücher schlaflose Nächte bereitet?

Bislang habe ich es am meisten genossen, meine Marshals zu schreiben. Ich mag das Geplänkel zwischen meinen beiden Helden und ich liebe es mir vorzustellen, was sie wohl als Nächstes tun würden. Ich hatte nie schlaflose Nächte, da ich im Allgemeinen schlafe sehr wenig. Wenn ich diese Werbungen sehe, wo Leute Medikamente nehmen, um schlafen zu können, bin ich verblüfft. Ich kann einschlafen, wenn ich nur zu lange still sitze. Ihr seht, ich bin immer bereit, einzuschlafen.

Gibt es bestimmte Lieder, die du während des Schreibens gerne hörst?

Das kommt auf die Geschichte an. Bei A Matter of Time hörte ich viel Trance Music. Bei meinen Wärtern hörte ich viel Jazz.

Findest du einen speziellen Typ Mann besonders faszinierend und bindest du ihn häufiger in deine Geschichten ein?

Ich liebe große, schweigsame Männer, die lange brauchen ehe sie bemerken, dass sie verliebt sind, aber wenn sie es dann verstanden haben, sich vollkommen darauf einlassen. Besitzergreifende, murrende, griesgrämige, sanfte Männer, die es brauchen geliebt zu werden sind meine Lieblinge, und in meinen Büchern kennt man sie als meine Alphas. Ich würde sagen, dass Rand Holloway von Timing, Sam Kage von A Matter of Time, Logan Church von der Serie Change of Heart und Ian Doyle von All Kinds of Tied Down in diese Kategorie fallen.

Gehörst du auch zu den Autoren, die von der Muse ständig Arschtritte bekommen, vor allem, wenn sie etwas will, das dir aktuell so gar nicht in den Zeitplan passt?

Bin ich. Was auch immer ich schreibe, ich will zur selben Zeit etwas anderes schreiben. Das passiert STÄNDIG. Das sind diese kleinen Plot-Bunnies, die sich in deine Gedanken hoppeln, obwohl man es nicht möchte. Es ist wirklich frustrierend.

Wachsen dir manche Protagonisten mehr ans Herz als andere? Wenn ja, welche magst du am liebsten? Gab es ein Paar, das dich in den Wahnsinn getrieben hat?

Zuletzt habe ich mich in Lazlo Maguire verliebt, der der Held in meiner nächsten Mangrove Geschichte Easy Evenings ist. Ich habe es mehr genossen seine Kurzgeschichte zu schreiben als die der anderen. Manchmal kann ich über das Ende des Buches hinausblicken, kann das gesamte Leben des Protagonisten erkennen und das zeigt mir, dass ich ihn am meisten liebe. Wie Weber von Frog. Ich könnte jeden Tag seines Lebens aufschreiben und wäre dabei glücklich. Meine Paare treiben mich nicht in den Wahnsinn, da ich weiß, wie sich die Beziehung entwickeln wird und dass sich die beiden lieben.

Wenn du mit einem deiner Protagonisten einen trinken gehen könntest, für wen würdest du dich entscheiden und warum?

Ich bin kein großer Trinker, aber ich würde gerne mit Nate von Acrobat einen Kaffee trinken gehen. Wir haben beide Englisch studiert, lieben dieselben Filme und er würde mich zum Einkaufen begleiten um neue Sachen fürs Haus zu finden. Er ist sehr nett und seine Anwesenheit beruhigend.

Welcher deiner Charaktere ähnelt dir charakterlich am meisten?

Sam Kage ist mir ähnlich. Er ist herrisch, laut, ein wenig egoistisch, hasst Veränderungen und will, dass die Menschen, die im wichtig sind, auf ihn hören.

Hast du schon einmal abfällige / beleidigende Bemerkungen zu deinen Büchern erhalten? Wenn ja, wie hast du darauf reagiert?

Ich musste schon ein paar verletzende Reviews einstecken, wurde aber nie beleidigt. Jeder ist berechtigt, eine eigene Meinung zu haben, und daran habe ich nichts auszusetzen.

Letzte Woche veröffentliche DSP die deutsche Übersetzung von deinem Buch Acrobat (Seiltänzer). Was hat dich inspiriert, dieses Buch zu schreiben?

Es gibt ein Gemälde mit dem Namen Parallel Dreams von Steve Walker. In diesem Bild schlafen zwei Männer, und als ich es das erste Mal sah, dachte ich darüber nach, was wohl die Geschichte dahinter sein könnte. Steve Walker bewilligte bei manchen Bildern, dass Dreamspinner Press diese verwenden könnte, weshalb ich sofort anfragte, ob es mein Cover werden könnte. Traurigerweise starb Steve Anfang 2012 und ich erinnere mich noch immer daran, wie traurig ich darüber war. Anne Cain, die Künstlerin, die das Cover für mein Buch gestaltete, war mit Steve befreundet, und so malte sie es als Hommage an ihn. Ganz vorn in meinem Buch gibt es eine berührende Anmerkung von ihr.

Gibt es eine Szene im Buch, die dich besonders berührte?

Die für mich berührendste Szene war, als Nate, Dreo und Michael zusammen auf der Couch saßen und einen Familienabend zu Hause genossen. Ich liebte diese Szene.

Würdest du sagen, dass die Muse eines bestimmten Charakters lauter schrie oder mehr Teile der Story diktierte als die eines anderen?

Da ich alle meine Bücher in der 1. Person schreibe, mit Ausnahme von einem Roman und einer Kurzgeschichte, ist es der Hauptcharakter, dessen Stimme ich immer am lautesten höre, da ich in seinem Kopf stecke. Bei diesem Buch war es Nate Qells, Englischprofessor am Tag, Babysitter in der Nacht. J

Wenn du einen Titelsong für dein Buch aussuchen müsstest, welcher wäre es?

Worrisome Heart von Melody Gardot. Ich hörte viel Jazz während ich Acrobat schrieb, aber dieses Lied ragt hervor, denn es handelt davon, dass man jemanden auch für seine Fehler lieben muss, und nicht nur für die guten Seiten, die man hat.

Sind weitere Reihen in dem Genre „paranormal“ geplant? Also Gestaltwandler, Vampire, Dämonen oder Ähnliches?

Ich muss das letzte Wächter-Buch schreiben und bringe zur Zeit meine L’Ange Serie zum Abschluss. Danach will ich das paranormale Genre eine Weile ruhen lassen. Das Bauen dieser Welten ist ermüdend, weshalb die Pause wohl länger dauern wird. Ich werde später vielleicht wieder mehr in diesem Genre schreiben, aber zur Zeit kann ich es mir nicht vorstellen.

Hast du schon mal mit dem Gedanken gespielt, mit einem anderen Autor/in an einem gemeinsamen Projekt zu schreiben?

Ich schrieb Anthologien mit anderen Autoren, aber mit einem anderen Autor an einem Buch zu schreiben, geschah nur mit Cardeno C. Ich trieb sie in den Wahnsinn, denn sie plant ihre Plots, aber wir haben beide haben es heil überstanden und sind noch immer Freunde.

Zu guter Letzt. Woran arbeitest du zur Zeit?

Zur Zeit schreibe ich am letzten Band meiner L’Ange Serie, und danach stürze ich mich auf Conrads Buch, was das Sequel zu Mine wird.

Noch einmal möchte ich mich herzlich für all die wundervollen Fragen bedanken.

German Interview with Ariel Tachna

June 21, 2015

Ich bedanke mich herzlich bei Ariel Tachna, die sich bereit erklärt hat, an diesem Interview teilzunehmen und euch Lesern Frage und Antwort zu stehen. Auch ein großes Dankeschön an euch Leser, denn ohne euch wäre dieses wunderbare Interview nicht zustande gekommen.

Ariel: Erstens, das sind großartige Fragen. Ich danke allen Lesern, die sie vorgeschlagen haben. Und ich hoffe, meine Antworten sind genauso interessant wie die Fragen an sich.

Was hat dich dazu gebracht, M/M Romanzen zu schreiben?

2004 war ich aktives Mitglied in einer Der Herr der Ringe Yahoo-Gruppe, die den Büchern gleichermaßen – wenn nicht sogar ein wenig mehr – wie auch den Filmen gewidmet war. Ein anderes Mitglied erwähnte Fanfiktions. Hoffnungslos naiv fragte ich: „Was sind Fanfiktions?“ Und die Person antwortete, das wären von Fans geschriebene Geschichten im Universum eines anderen Autors. Ich war fasziniert. Wisst ihr, ich war total in Aragorn und Arwen verschossen, und war total unzufrieden wie wenig Seiten Tolkien den beiden in seinem Buch gewidmet hat. Daher war die Idee mehr über ihre Geschichte zu lesen, um die Lücken zu füllen, faszinierend. Ich suchte und fand dabei alles Mögliche, inklusive Geschichten über Aragorn und … Legolas. Das ließ mich die Stirn runzeln, dann schüttelte ich mit dem Kopf und las weiterhin die Geschichten über Aragorn und Arwen, aber diese Aragorn / Legolas Geschichten tauchten immer wieder auf. Daher sprang ich ins eiskalte Wasser und las eine von ihnen. Und dann eine weitere. Und ich sagte zu mir selbst: „Ich kann das auch. Ich kann es sogar besser.“ Deshalb versuchte ich es. Ich schrieb eine epische Der Herr der Ringe Fanfiktion (180 Kapitel, 690 000 Wörter – ich brauchte ein Jahr) und war süchtig. Ich fand eine Online-Community und die Leidenschaft zu schreiben, die ich irgendwann nach meinem Universitätsabschluss verloren hatte. Das war vor elf Jahren, und ich habe es nie bereut.

Findest du neben dem Schreiben noch Zeit, um zu lesen? Was sind deine Lieblingsbücher, die du immer wieder lesen könntest?

Heutzutage finde ich wenig Zeit um zu lesen, aber wenn ich es tue, tendiere ich dazu, auf meine alten Lieblingsbücher zurückzugreifen. Melanie Rawns Die Drachenprinz-Saga (Dragon Prince series), alles von Rhianne Aile, Zahra Owens und natürlich auch von Mary Calmes.

Ich hoffe, die Frage ist nicht zu privat, wenn ja, musst du natürlich nicht darauf antworten: Wie vereinst du deine Liebe zum Schreiben mit deinem Real Life (Familie, Freunden, dem Partner etc.), ohne dass einer dabei zu kurz kommt?

Es ist ein Balanceakt, so viel ist sicher. Es hilft, dass ich von zu Hause aus arbeite, so habe ich einen recht flexiblen Zeitplan. Wenn meine Kinder in der Schule sind, versuche ich so viel meiner Arbeit und meines Schreibens zu erledigen, wie ich nur kann, sodass ich ihnen, wenn sie nach Hause kommen, die Aufmerksamkeit geben kann, die sie brauchen. Sie sind jung, aber keine Babys, und wollen daher nicht, dass ihre Mama ständig an ihrer Seite ist. Daher kann es sein, dass ich an manchen Nachmittagen oder Abenden mehr schaffe.

Schreibst du an mehreren Büchern gleichzeitig oder konzentrierst du dich lieber nur auf eines? Planst du eine Serie im Vorhinein oder ‘passiert’ sie einfach?

Es variiert. Zur Zeit gibt es fünf Bücher, die beendet werden wollen, aber ich schreibe nur an zwei von ihnen aktiv. An einem schreibe ich zusammen mit Nicki Bennett, das andere ist ein Soloprojekt.

Gibt es bestimmte Stärken und Schwächen, die du als Autor besitzt?

Meine Stärke ist sicherlich die Tiefe meiner Charaktere. Es haben nicht nur die zwei Hauptprotagonisten eine Geschichte, sondern jeder, sogar wenn es niemals auf ein Blatt Papier geschrieben wird. Das ist eines der Dinge, das ich so sehr an Serien liebe. Ich habe die Möglichkeit mehr von ihrer Geschichte und ihnen zu zeigen, da sie immer wieder auftauchen, oft sogar in unterschiedlichen Rollen.

Meine Schwäche ist mein etwas langatmiger Schreibstil. Ich kann eine Geschichte nicht eher enden lassen als dass sie für mich komplett ist, unerheblich ob andere denken, dass es so besser wäre.

Woher nimmst du deine Ideen? Was inspiriert dich? Fließen private Erlebnisse oder Menschen, die du getroffen hast, in deine Geschichten mit ein?

Mich inspiriert alles. Ein kleiner Teil einer zufällig gehörten Konversation, eine bestimmte Stelle in einem Musikstück, das Lachen meiner Kinder. Ich verwende Ereignisse und Menschen, die mir begegnet sind. The Path, zum Beispiel, wurde alleine von meiner Reise nach Peru vor zwei Jahren inspiriert. Seducing C. C. ist eine Mischung aus Leuten und Ereignissen von den Sommercamps, die ich früher besucht und in denen ich 16 Jahre lang gearbeitet habe.

Wachsen dir manche Protagonisten mehr ans Herz als andere? Wenn ja, welche magst du am liebsten?

Ich muss mich in sie verlieben, um über sie schreiben zu können, da sie ansonsten nicht glaubhaft sind. Aber ja, manche bleiben bei mir. Jean und Raymond von der Blutspartnerschaft Serie (Partnership in Blood) werden immer einen besonderen Platz in meinem Herzen einnehmen. Dasselbe gilt für Gabriel und Lucio von The Inventor’s Companion, obwohl es hierfür einen anderen Grund gibt.

Du hast zeitgenössische, historische, western und paranormale Geschichten geschrieben. Welchen Stil bevorzugst du und warum?

Ich liebe sie alle. Manche Geschichten können in jedem Schauplatz angesiedelt sein, aber manch andere brauchen ein bestimmtes Setting, damit sie glaubhaft sind und funktionieren. Ich liebe auch die Herausforderung, Welten zu bauen, vor allem in den Genres historisch, paranormal und Sci-Fi. Ich kann keine Abkürzungen in diesen Geschichten verwenden, da nichts in diesen Welten dem Leser wirklich vertraut ist.

Gehörst du auch zu den Autoren, die von der Muse ständig Arschtritte bekommen, vor allem, wenn sie etwas will, das dir aktuell so gar nicht in den Zeitplan passt?

Ich bin ein totaler Sklave meiner Musen. Manchmal habe ich nicht mal mehr einen Entwurf, da sie ihn sowieso ignorieren. Ich kenne meine Charaktere (zumindest ein wenig), ich kenne die Situation, die sie zusammenbringt und ich kenne das Problem, das sie auseinanderhält, wenn ich mit dem Schreiben beginne. Ich denke, ich kenne auch das Ende, da ich weiß, dass sie am Ende zusammen und glücklich sein werden. Der Rest ist eine Entdeckungsreise für mich. Ich tu mein Bestes, um nicht im Weg zu stehen, und schreibe eher ihre Geschichte als sie meinen Ideen anzupassen.

Wie lange schreibst du durchschnittlich an einer Geschichte und wie sieht dein Schreiballtag im Allgemeinen aus?

Das hängt von der Länge und der Vielschichtigkeit der Geschichte ab, aber auch davon was sonst noch an Arbeit ansteht, Familie (wie viele Stunden kann ich freischaufeln, um zu schreiben) und wie stark mich diese Geschichte einfängt. Ich schrieb Perilous Partnership in fünf Wochen. Die Geschichte, an der ich jetzt arbeite, wird weniger als drei Wochen brauchen. Aber es gibt auch Bücher, für die ich Monate brauche.

Hast du schon einmal abfällige / beleidigende Bemerkungen zu deinen Büchern erhalten? Wenn ja, wie hast du darauf reagiert?

Ich bin mir sicher, dass es mehrere Leute gibt, die sich abfällig über meine Bücher äußerten, aber ich lese keine Reviews, da sie für die Leser da sind, nicht für mich. Es gab Leute, die überrascht waren, als sie herausfanden, dass ich Gay Romance schreibe, aber sie waren eher neugierig als verärgert.

Da du den Übersetzungsbereich bei Dreamspinner Press’ koordinierst, gab es natürlich auch ein paar Fragen zu diesem Thema.

Nach welchen Kriterien wird ein Buch zur Übersetzung ausgewählt? Inwiefern geht ich dabei auch auf Leserwünsche ein? 

Wir berücksichtigen definitiv Leserwünsche. Wir schauen auch auf die Verkäufe der bereits veröffentlichten Bücher, um einen Trend in Hinblick auf Autoren und Genres zu finden. Von da aus versuchen wir ein Gleichgewicht zwischen neuen und klassischen Veröffentlichungen sowie Serien und Einzelbänden zu finden. Natürlich kann es passieren, dass manchmal alles um uns rum einstürzt und wir noch mal neu anfangen müssen. Aber das sind Dinge, die wir schon beim Planen der Veröffentlichungen versuchen zu berücksichtigen.

Wenn der erste Band einer Serie veröffentlicht wurde, werden die anderen Bände dann automatisch auch übersetzt oder macht ihr das von den Verkaufszahlen abhängig? In welchen Zeitabständen werden die Bücher von Serien übersetzt?

Wir versuchen, wenn möglich, ganze Serien zu übersetzen. Die Zeitabstände hängen von mehreren Faktoren ab, inklusive der Verfügbarkeit der Übersetzer und all den anderen Dingen, die ich oben schon genannt habe. Es hängt auch davon ab, ob die Bücher eine tatsächliche Serie sind, wo du kein wirkliches Ende bis zum letzten Band hast, oder ob es mehrere Spinn-Offs sind, wo jedes Buch für sich alleine steht und das nächste eher ein zusätzlicher Bonus als ein unabdingbarer Bestandteil ist.

Wie lange dauert es durchschnittlich, bis ein Buch übersetzt und überprüft ist? Kannst du uns ein wenig über den Übersetzungsablauf erzählen?

Es kann 8-16 Wochen dauern, ehe ein Buch übersetzt ist. Das hängt natürlich von der Länge und der Verfügbarkeit der Übersetzer ab. Dann dauert es weitere 4-8 Wochen, ehe das Lektorat fertig ist. Wenn die Geschichte lektoriert ist, geht sie zurück an den Übersetzer, damit der sie noch mal überarbeiten kann (für gewöhnlich dauert das eine weitere Woche). Anschließend wird die Übersetzung an die deutschen Koordinatoren geschickt, die sie noch mal überprüfen. Was anschließend geschieht, hängt von ihnen ab. Manchmal senden sie mir die Übersetzungen zu, damit sie veröffentlicht werden können. Manchmal senden sie sie zurück, damit sie noch mal lektoriert werden. Manchmal sagen sie mir auch, dass ich die Übersetzung wegschmeißen soll, da sie so nicht veröffentlicht werden kann und man sie neu übersetzen muss. Ihr seht, Übersetzungen sind kein linearer Prozess.

Warum erfährt man als deutschsprachiger Leser erst so kurzfristig, welche Übersetzungen in den nächsten Wochen erscheinen?

Wir hatten Probleme mit dem Formatieren unserer E-Books bei den Übersetzungen. Sogar wenn alles in der Word-Datei perfekt aussah, konnte es geschehen, dass das E-Book mit Fehlern zurückkam. Deshalb haben wir uns dazu entschieden, die Veröffentlichungen nicht eher bekannt zu geben, ehe wir das fertige E-Book ohne Formatierungsfehler vor uns liegen haben. Wir geben den Veröffentlichungstermin lieber kurzfristig an, sodass das Buch dann aber auch wirklich an dem Tag erscheint, als ihn früher bekannt zu geben, um dann das Datum wegen diverser Fehler zu ändern.

Letzte Woche veröffentliche DSP die deutsche Übersetzung von deinem Buch Dein Stern am Himmel (Inherit the Sky). Wie kommt es, dass die Geschichte im australischen Outback spielt und nicht wie viele andere Geschichten im Westen von Amerika? Hast du zu diesem Teil des Landes eine spezielle Bindung?

Das ist eine amüsante Geschichte. Ich folge ein paar Schauspielern und vor einigen Jahren wurden zwei von ihnen fälschlicherweise eine australische Staatsbürgerschaft in den Medien angedichtet. Ich lachte mit einer Freundin darüber, die dann zu mir sagte: „Ich mag die Idee, dass die zwei zusammen nach Australien abhauen und eine Schafsfarm leiten.“ Meine Musen stimmten ihr zu.

Cherish the Land ist der fünfte und zur Zeit auch letzte Band der Lang Downs Serie. Sind noch weitere Geschichten geplant oder müssen wir uns nach Cherish the Land von unseren Lieblingen verabschieden?

Cherish the Land ist das letzte Buch, das ich für die Serie derzeit geplant habe, aber wir haben ja schon über meine Musen geredet. Wenn sie entschließen, dass es eine weitere Story gibt, die erzählt werden muss, werde ich wie immer auf sie hören.

Wer war der am schwierigsten zu schreibende Charakter der Lang Downs Serie?

Ohne Zweifel war es Seth, da seine Wunden so tief waren. Aber zur selben Zeit war er überraschenderweise sehr offen, als er mich erst mal in seinen Kopf ließ. Ich hatte Angst, dass ich bzw. die Geschichte der Tiefe seiner Verletzungen nicht gerecht werden würde, und dass ich ihn weinerlich statt ernsthaft aufgewühlt für die Leser rüberkommen lasse.

Besteht die Möglichkeit, dass es einmal eine Kurzgeschichte zu Caines Onkel geben wird?

Ich habe darüber nachgedacht, bin aber noch nicht bereit Ja zu sagen. Aber ich habe auch schon vor langer Zeit gelernt auch nicht Nein zu sagen.

Was inspirierte dich, die Blutspartnerschaft Serie (Partnership in Blood series) zu schreiben? War es schon immer als Serie geplant oder hätte es eigentlich ein Einzelband werden sollen?

Vor 11 Jahren war ich Mitglied in einer Autorengruppe, wo es jeden Monat Schreibaufgaben zu einem gewissen Thema gab. Jeder, der wollte, konnte eine Geschichte schreiben und sie mit der Gruppe teilen, um so Kritik zu erhalten. Am Ende jedes Monats konnte jeder für seine Lieblingsgeschichte abstimmen. Im Oktober vor 11 Jahren bestand die Aufgabe darin, eine übernatürliche Geschichte zu schreiben. Ich habe aber zu der Zeit an drei großen und mehreren kleinen Projekten gearbeitet, weshalb ich mich dazu entschied, diesen Monat auszulassen. Dann schlief ich ein und träumte einen meiner lebhaftesten Träume. Ich sah, wie sich Alain und Orlando am Friedhof trafen. Ich sah Orlando, wie er aus einem Gebäude stolperte, während die Sonne hinter ihm aufging, und die Szene einfach nur bedrohlich wirkte. Und ich sah eine andere Szene, die ich aber nicht beschreiben werde, da ich das Ende spoilern würde. Als ich aufwachte, lag ich einfach nur da und starrte auf meine Zimmerdecke, versuchte währenddessen alle drei Szenen miteinander zu verknüpfen. Ich begann mit dem Schreiben am Nachmittag.

Ich wusste schon am Anfang, dass die Geschichte nicht kurz werden würde, aber ich stellte sie mir nie als Serie vor. Zu der Zeit wurden meine Bücher noch nicht veröffentlicht, deshalb habe ich nie einen Gedanken daran verschwendet, wie und ob der gesamte Plot in einem Band Platz finden würde. Zu der Zeit als meine Bücher 2007 veröffentlicht wurden, arbeitete ich seit 3 Jahren an Blutspartnerschaft (Partnership in Blood). Was später zu Allianz des Blutes (Alliance in Blood) werden würde, war zu der Zeit fertiggeschrieben, ebenso das meiste von Pakt des Blutes (Covenant in Blood), aber noch nicht mal die Hälfte der Geschichte war damit erzählt. Ich sprach mit Elizabeth North, der Geschäftsführerin von DSP, und wir entschieden, dass die Bücher in einem Zeitabstand von jeweils sechs Monaten veröffentlicht werden würden, damit ich genug Zeit hätte, um die Serie zu beenden. Ich hielt mich an den Zeitplan und schrieb Versöhnung des Blutes (Reparation in Blood). Ich sendete es per E-Mail an Elizabeth, mit dem Betreff: GESCHAFFT! Sie schrieb zurück und sagte: „Weißt du …“ und plötzlich war die Serie nicht mehr beendet. Schlussendlich beendete ich das letzte Buch im Oktober letzten Jahres, insgesamt 10 Jahre und eine Million Wörter später.

Was war die für dich am schwersten zu schreibende Szene in dieser Serie?

Ich denke, da gibt es ein Unentschieden zwischen dem Epilog von Versöhnung des Blutes (Reparation in Blood) und dem Prolog von Partnership Reborn. Wenn ich jetzt mehr sagen würde, würde ich aber manche Leser spoilern.

Zu guter Letzt. Woran arbeitest du zur Zeit?

Lasst mich mal nachdenken …

Nicki und ich arbeiten an All for Love, dem dritten Buch unserer historischen Haudegen Serie, die mit Checkmate beginnt.

Ich selbst arbeite an einer Romanze, die sich auf einer Pferdefarm in dem Ort, wo ich aufgewachsen bin, abspielt. Es ist eine Geschichte über Verlust, Genesung und das Lernen, erneut lieben zu können. Ich arbeite an einer Geschichte, die sich in einem Restaurant in Paris abspielt. Einer der Hauptprotagonisten ist ein grenzwertiger sexsüchtiger Kellner. Der andere ist ein amerikanischer Geschäftsmann, der eine Konferenz in Paris besucht. Sie treffen sich in diesem Restaurant, haben ein Techtelmechtel, das aber beiden mehr bedeutet als sie sich jemals gedacht hätten, und nun müssen sie entscheiden, wie es weitergehen soll. Ich schreibe auch an einer anderen Kellner-Geschichte, die in Montréal spielt. Es ist eine May-December Romance (Anm.: May-December Romance bedeutet, dass es bei einem Paar einen sehr großen Altersunterschied gibt. Die eine Person ist jung und ihm „Frühling“ seines / ihres Lebens – daher Mai, während die andere Person den Winter repräsentiert – deshalb Dezember) zwischen einem Berufskellner und einem jungen Mann, der die Tische in einer lokalen Schwulenbar bedient, um über die Runden zu kommen. Ich habe auch ca. die Hälfte des ersten Bandes einer Mystery-Serie geschrieben. Alle Bände folgen ein und demselben FBI Agenten für Vermisstenfälle bei fünf unterschiedlichen Fällen. Jeder Fall hat seine eigene Romanze, aber was der Kriminalbeamte von diesen Romanzen lernt, wirkt sich auch auf sein eigenes Leben aus.

Ariel Tachna Talks Lord of the Rings, Dreamspinner Translations, and Much More!

June 21, 2015

A big thank you to Ariel Tachna, who agreed to do this interview and answer the questions of her readers. I also want to thank you, the readers, who came up with the questions and thus made this interview possible.

Ariel: First of all, these are great questions. Thank you to all the readers who proposed them. I hope my answers are as interesting as the questions themselves!

What made you start writing M/M novels?

In 2004, I was active on a Lord of the Rings yahoo group devoted to the books as much or maybe even more than to the movies. Someone on that group mentioned fan fiction. Being hopelessly naïve, I said, “What’s fan fiction?” The person answered that it was stories written by fans in the universe of another author. I was intrigued. You see, I’d fallen in love with Aragorn and Arwen and was woefully unsatisfied with the amount of time on page Tolkien devoted to them. So the idea of getting more of their story, something to fill in the gaps, was intriguing. I went searching and came across all kinds of things, including stories about Aragorn and… Legolas. I frowned a little, shook my head, and went to read Aragorn and Arwen stories, but these Aragorn/Legolas stories kept popping up. So I dipped my toe in the water and read one. And then I read another. And then I said to myself, “I could do this. I could do this better.” So I tried. I wrote an epic Lord of the Rings fan fiction (180 chapters, 690,000 words—it took me a year) and I was hooked. I’d found a community online and a passion for writing again that I had somewhat lost after I graduated from university. That was eleven years ago and I’ve never looked back.

While being all busy with writing, do you even find the time to read? What are your favorite books you can read again and again?

I don’t find a lot of time to read these days, but when I do, I tend to fall back on old favorites. Melanie Rawn’s Dragon Prince series, anything by Rhianne Aile, anything by Zahra Owens, anything by Mary Calmes.

I hope this question is not too personal; if yes you of course don’t have to answer it. How do you unite your writing with your private life (family, friends, partner, etc.) without neglecting anyone or anything?

It’s a juggling act, that’s for sure. It helps that I work from home, so I have some flexibility in my schedule. When my children are at school, I try to get as much work and writing done as I can so that when they come home, I can give them the attention they need. They’re young, but not babies, and don’t want Mama hovering over them constantly, so I sometimes get a little more done in the afternoons or evenings.

Do you work at several books at the same time or do you rather focus on one? 

That varies. Right now, I have five books that are ongoing, but only two that I’m actively working on. One is something I’m co-writing with Nicki Bennett, the other is a solo project.

What would you say are your strengths and weaknesses as an author?

My strength is definitely the depth of my cast of characters. It’s not just the two romantic leads who have a story. Everyone does, even if most of it never appears on page. That’s one of the things I love so much about writing a series. I get the chance to show more of the story for everyone because they keep coming back up, often in different roles as the series goes on.

My weakness is that I tend to get long-winded. I can’t let go of a story until it’s done, regardless of when other people think it should be done.

Where do you get your ideas from? What inspires you? Do certain events or people you met inspire you when writing? 

Everything inspires me. A snippet of overheard conversation, a line of music, my children’s laughter. I have used events and people in my writing. The Path, for example, is entirely inspired by my trip to Peru two years ago. Seducing C.C. is an amalgam of people and events at the summer camps I attended and then worked at for sixteen years.

Do some protagonists grow dear to your heart more than others? If yes, which are the ones you like best? 

I have to fall in love with them to write them or they aren’t believable, but yes, some stay with me. Jean and Raymond from the Partnership in Blood series will always hold a special place in my heart. The same is true, though for different reasons, of Gabriel and Lucio from The Inventor’s Companion.

You’ve written contemporaries, western, historicals, and paranormals. Which do you prefer and why?

I love them all. Some stories can be told in any setting, but others need a specific setting to work. I also love the challenge of worldbuilding in historicals, paranormals, and sci-fi stories. I can’t take shortcuts in a story where nothing is necessarily familiar to the reader.

Are you one of the authors that get kicked by their muse all of the time, especially when she wants something that doesn’t really fit into your writing timetable in that situation?

I am a complete and total slave to my muses. Most of the time I don’t even bother with an outline anymore because they ignore it. I know my characters (at least a little), I know the situation that brings them together, and I know the problem keeping them apart when I start writing. I suppose I know the ending as well since I know they end up together. The rest is a path of discovery for me as I write. I do my best to get out of the way and tell their story rather than making them conform to my ideas.

How long does it take you on average to write a story and what does your daily writing routine look?

It depends on the length and complexity of the story, on what else is going on at work and with my family (how many hours can I actually dedicate to writing), and how strongly the story grabs me. I wrote Perilous Partnership in five weeks. The story I’m working on now will take less than three weeks. I’ve had other books take me months.

Have you ever got insulted because of your books? Or have your books ever got insulted? If yes, how did you react to it?

I’m sure there are people who have insulted my books, but I don’t read reviews because they’re for readers, not for me. I’ve had people react in surprise when they find out I write gay romance, but it’s always been more curious than angry.

As you’re Dreamspinner Press’s translations coordinator there’re some questions about this topic.

Which are the criteria that matter when choosing a book to translate? To what extent do you respond to requests coming from the readers?

We definitely take into consideration reader requests. We also look at sales figures for already published books to seek trends in terms of authors and genres that sell well. From there, we try to balance new releases with classics as well as stand-alones with series. Of course sometimes all that juggling comes tumbling down around our heads and we have to start over, but those are the things we try to take into account as we work on the publishing schedule.

If the first volume of a book is released, does this automatically mean that the other volumes will be translated as well or does it depend on how well they sell? How much time passes between translating several books of a series?

Our intention is to translate complete series whenever possible. The timing of it, however, depends on a variety of factors including the availability of the translator and all the other bits of juggling from the answer above. It also depends on whether the books are a true series, where you don’t have the real end until the last book, or whether they’re more spinoffs, where each book stands alone and the next book is more an added bonus than a necessary component.

How long does it take on average to translate and correct a book? Can you tell us a bit more about the process of translating?

It can take anywhere from eight to sixteen weeks to translate a book, depending on length and the availability of the translator. From there, another four to eight weeks for proofreading. Once it’s proofread, it goes back to the translator for revisions (usually another week). Then it goes on to our German coordinators for a final read. What happens then depends on them. Sometimes they send it to me to publish. Sometimes they send it back for a second proofreading. Sometimes they tell me to throw it out and start over. Translation is not a linear process.

Why do the German-speaking readers learn on short notice about which of the translated books will be released within the following few weeks?

We have had issues with the formatting of our eBooks with the translations. Even when everything looks perfect in the Word file, sometimes the eBook formats come back with errors. We made the decision early on not to announce the publication of a book until we have the eBooks with no formatting errors. We would rather give short notice on a book that will actually come out on time than give longer notice and have to change a release date because of errors.

Last week DSP published the German translation of Inherit the Sky. Why is this story set in the Australian Outback and not like most of the other westerns in America’s West? Do you have a special connection to this part of the country?

This is a funny story. I follow a few actors, and several years ago, two of those actors were misattributed Australian nationality in the media. I was laughing about it with a friend of mine, who said, “I like the idea of them running off to Australia together to raise sheep.” My muses agreed with her.

Cherish the Land is the fifth and also the last book of the Lang Downs series at the moment. Will there be more books or do we have to say goodbye to our darlings?

Cherish the Land is the last book currently planned in the series, but we’ve discussed my muses. If they decide there’s another story to tell, I will listen as I always do.

Who was the most difficult character to write in the Lang Downs series?

Seth, without a doubt, because of how deep his wounds run. But at the same time, he was surprisingly open once I got into his head. My fear was in not doing justice to the depth of his issues and having him come across as whiny instead of genuinely troubled.

Is there a chance to read a novel or novella about Caine’s uncle Michael?

I have thought about it. I’m not ready to say yes, but I learned a long time ago never to say no.

What inspired you to write the Partnership in Blood series? Do you plan it as a series in advance?

Eleven years ago, I belonged to an online writer community, and each month we had themed challenges. Anyone who wanted to could write a story and share it with the group for critique, and then at the end of the month, everyone would vote on their favorite story. In October of that year, the theme was to write a supernatural story. I had three other big projects and several smaller ones going on at the time, so I decided I’d pass on that month’s theme. Then I fell asleep, and I dreamed one of the most vivid dreams I’ve ever had. I saw Alain and Orlando meeting at the cemetery, I saw Orlando come stumbling out of a building with the sun rising behind it and a sense of grave danger, and I saw one other scene that I won’t describe so as not to spoil the ending. When I woke up, I lay there and stared at the ceiling, trying to connect the dots between the three images. I started writing that afternoon.

I knew from the beginning that the story wouldn’t be short, but I didn’t envision it as a series. I wasn’t published then, so I wasn’t thinking in terms of how it would fit into a single volume. By the time I was first published in 2007, I’d been working on Partnership in Blood for almost three years. What became Alliance in Blood was finished, as was most of Covenant in Blood, but I still had over half the original story to tell. I spoke with Elizabeth North, Dreamspinner’s Executive Director, and we decided to have the books come out six months apart to give me time to finish the series. I kept to that schedule and wrote Reparation in Blood. I sent it to Elizabeth with an e-mail that said DONE! She e-mailed me back and said, “You know…” and suddenly I wasn’t done. I finally finished the series last October, ten years and one million words after I started.

What is the hardest scene you ever had to write in this series?

That would be a tossup between the epilogue of Reparation in Blood and the prologue of Partnership Reborn. If I say more than that, I’ll spoil it for people.

 Last but not least: What are you currently working?

Let’s see…

Nicki and I are working on All for Love, the third book in our historical swashbuckler series that begins with Checkmate.

By myself, I’m working on a category romance set on a horse farm in the town where I grew up. It’s the story of loss, recovery, and learning to love again. I’m also working on a story set in a restaurant in Paris, with a borderline sex-addicted waiter as one of the romantic leads. The other one is an American businessman in Paris for a conference. They meet in the restaurant, have a fling that ends up meaning more to them both than they first expected, and now they have to decide what to do about it. I have another waiter story, set in Montréal. It’s a May-December romance between a career waiter and a young man who waits tables at a local gay bar to make ends meet. I also have half of the first book in a mystery series written. The series follows the same FBI missing persons detective on five different cases. Each case has its own romance, but what the detective learns from those romances informs his decisions about his own life as well.

KC Burn German Interview

June 18, 2015

Ich bedanke mich herzlich bei KC Burn, die sich bereit erklärt hat, an diesem Interview teilzunehmen und euch Lesern Frage und Antwort zu stehen. Auch ein großes Dankeschön an euch Leser, denn ohne euch wäre dieses wunderbare Interview nicht zustande gekommen.

Zuallererst: Verrate etwas über dich, das deine Leser überraschen würde.

Ich erhalte sehr oft Kommentare von Lesern, wie sehr sie die Familie O’Donnell mögen würden. Deshalb würde es wohl die meisten Leute überraschen, dass sich meine Eltern scheiden ließen, als ich ein Teenager war. Ich bin ein Einzelkind, und meine Mutter neigt zu emotionalen und verbalen Missbrauch.

Was hat dich dazu gebracht, M/M Romanzen zu schreiben? Wie lange schreibst du schon und wie lange hat es gebraucht, bis du von einem Verlag publiziert wurdest?

Mir war seit meinem 10. Lebensjahr bewusst, dass ich eine Autorin sein möchte. So gesehen war es ein langer Prozess! Ich habe mein erstes Buch 1999 fertiggeschrieben, und es war schrecklich. Aber ich hab weitergemacht. M/M Geschichten zu schreiben war eher ein Unfall. Ich hatte den Plot einer Geschichte im Kopf, realisierte aber, dass der Konflikt zwischen meinen Charakteren stärker wäre, wenn meine Protagonisten männlich sind. Deshalb hab ich das Buch so geschrieben und hatte Spaß dran. Und es war das erste Buch von mir, das veröffentlicht wurde – und zwar 2010.

Wurde dir jemals bei einem deiner Manuskripte nahegelegt, eine Änderung vorzunehmen, die dir überhaupt nicht zugesagt hat?

Ja, aber es waren nur geringfügige Änderungen, und meine Lektoren akzeptierten die Gründe, warum ich diese Änderungen nicht machen wollte. Zur Zeit arbeite ich an einem Buch, wo der Lektor um größere Änderungen bat. Zuerst hab ich nicht zugestimmt, aber schlussendlich doch entschieden, dass ich es ausprobieren werde. Ich denke, es wird ein starkes Buch, auch wenn es nicht komplett so sein wird, wie ich es mir vorgestellt habe.

Wie viel Einfluss hast du bei der Gestaltung deiner Buchcover?

Das hängt vom Verlag ab. Bei allen drei Verlagen fülle ich ein ellenlanges Formular aus, wo ich die Charaktere beschreibe, die Handlungsorte, den Hauptplot und signifikante Details. Aber wenn der Künstler mal etwas gestaltet hat? Nur einer der Verlage erlaubte es mir, um Änderungen bei dem Cover zu bitten.

Es gibt ziemlich viele weibliche Autorin und Leser in diesem Genre. Hast du eine Idee, warum dem so ist?

Laut den amerikanischen Autoren, die Romanzen schreiben (US-Daten, nehme ich an), sind über 80% ihrer Leser weiblich. Bei M/M ist die Zahl möglicherweise etwas niedriger, aber Fakt ist, dass Frauen die primären Leser dieses Genres sind, unerheblich bei welchem Pairing. Deshalb macht es Sinn, dass die meisten Autoren dieses Genres ebenfalls Frauen sind.

Hast du schon einmal an einer Schreibblockade gelitten? Wenn ja, was hast du getan, um diese zu überwinden?

Ich weiß nicht, ob ich jemals eine Schreibblockade hatte. Ich weiß vielleicht nicht woher ich einen speziellen Handlungsstrang nehmen soll, aber ich habe immer Ideen. Mein Problem entsteht eher, wenn ich mal vor dem Computer sitze. Manchmal habe ich dazu einfach keine Lust. Wenn das geschieht, schaue ich mir meist einen Film an oder spiele Gesellschaftspiele mit meinem Ehemann. Das hilft mir, meine Gedanken in eine andere Richtung zu lenken, damit ich mich wieder vollkommen erquickt an die Arbeit machen kann.

Ich hoffe, die Frage ist nicht zu privat, wenn ja, musst du natürlich nicht darauf antworten: Wie vereinst du deine Liebe zum Schreiben mit deinem Real Life (Familie, Freunden, dem Partner etc.), ohne dass einer dabei zu kurz kommt?

Hahaha! Ich vernachlässige meinen Ehemann! Aber er ist sehr unterstützend, und er editiert all meine Bücher. Er weiß, wie wichtig mir das Schreiben ist, und sagt oft: Solltest du nicht eigentlich schreiben? Meine Freunde und Familie wissen, worüber ich schreibe, und ich habe keine Kinder, das hilft. Mein Mann spielt außerdem viele Computerspiele, deshalb ist er oft ziemlich zufrieden, wenn ich schreibe, da er zu der Zeit zocken kann.

Schreibst du an mehreren Büchern gleichzeitig oder konzentrierst du dich lieber nur auf eines?

Ich habe einen Vollzeitjob, deshalb fällt es mir leichter nur an einem Buch zu schreiben. Würde ich Vollzeit als Autorin arbeiten, würde ich wohl versuchen an zwei oder mehreren gleichzeitig zu schreiben.

Hast du einen bestimmten Schreiballtag und wie lange schreibst du durchschnittlich an einer Geschichte?

Das letzte Jahr war schwierig für mich, weshalb mein Zeitplan ein totales Durcheinander war. Nun ja, normalerweise versuche ich immer am späten Nachmittag oder am Abend zu schreiben, nachdem ich von meinem eigentlichen Job nach Hause komme. Ich habe Rückenprobleme, weshalb ich normalerweise 45-60 Minuten durchgehend schreibe, dann eine Pause mache um das Abendessen oder den Abwasch zu machen oder mit meinem Mann Zeit zu verbringen. Ich brauche ca. 3 Stunden für 1000 Wörter (schreiben, es selbst noch mal überarbeiten, Szene ausfeilen). Das heißt, für eine Geschichte mit 60 000 Wörtern brauche ich ca. 180 Stunden, ehe ich sie meinem Lektor zukommen lasse.

Was für eine Szene war die am schwersten zu schreibende?  

In meiner zweiten Sci-Fi Geschichte „Alien ‚n‘ Outlaw“ war einer der Hauptcharaktere ein Alien. Die erste Szene seiner Erzählperspektive war vermutlich die schwerste zu schreibende Szene, weil ich es schaffen musste, ihn glaubhaft nichtmenschlich aber trotzdem für Leser greifbar zu machen, die eben alles Menschen sind!

Wenn du mit einem Protagonisten irgendeines Buches einen trinken gehen könntest, für welchen würdest du dich entscheiden und warum?

Amelia Peabody von Elizabeth Peters. Amelia Peabody ist eine weibliche Ägyptologin im späten 1800, die zu einer Amateur-Detektivin wird, da es in ihrer Umgebung zu mehreren Morden kommt. Ich habe das alte Ägypten schon immer geliebt, und ich liebe auch Kriminalromane. Und ich mag es sehr, dass sie so ein starker weiblicher Charakter ist, der gegen die Stereotype dieser Zeit ankämpft. Und sie entdeckt einen Haufen vergrabener Schätze.

Gibt es einen Protagonisten, der dir charakterlich ziemlich ähnlich ist?

Eigentlich gibt es in jedem meiner Charaktere ein wenig von mir. Aber ich denke nicht, dass mir einer von ihnen wirklich ähnlich ist. Ich bin eher langweilig – und niemand will darüber ein Buch lesen!

Gehörst du auch zu den Autoren, die von der Muse ständig Arschtritte bekommen, vor allem, wenn sie etwas will, das dir aktuell so gar nicht in den Zeitplan passt?

Meine Charaktere schlagen oft Wege ein, mit denen ich manchmal niemals gerechnet hätte. Aber ich plane auch nicht wirklich viel, ehe ich mit dem Schreiben beginne, so kann ich mich gut treiben lassen. Falls währenddessen eine Idee für eine völlig andere Geschichte aufkommt, mache ich eine Pause und schreibe die Idee nieder, sodass ich dann meist wieder zum eigentlichen Projekt zurückkommen kann.

Hast du schon einmal abfällige / beleidigende Bemerkungen zu deinen Büchern erhalten? Wenn ja, wie hast du darauf reagiert?

Ich wurde nie beleidigt, nein, aber ich bekam schlechte Reviews, wie es jeder Autor tut. Bei den ersten paar habe ich geweint, und mein Mann kaufte mir Eiscreme. Hätte ich jetzt jedes Mal, wenn ich ein schlechtes Review bekam, Eiscreme gegessen, würde ich wohl nicht mehr durch die Tür passen. Mittlerweile kann ich besser damit umgehen, sie tun natürlich etwas weh, aber beeinflussen mein Schreiben nicht.

Letzte Woche veröffentliche DSP die deutsche Übersetzung von deinem Buch Küss mich, Bulle (Cop Out). Was inspirierte dich zu dieser Geschichte?

Ich bin mir nicht sicher. Ich habe an einem meiner Sci-Fi Bücher gearbeitet, und plötzlich hatte ich eine Szene in meinem Kopf, wo ein Cop zum Haus seines toten Partners geht, um die Angehörigen zu benachrichtigen. Dort findet er heraus, dass der Partner einen Ehemann und keine Ehefrau hatte. Offensichtlich änderte sich die Szene als ich mit dem Buch begann, aber sie war sehr kraftvoll und die Charaktere beharrten hartnäckig darauf, dass ich ihre Geschichte erzähle.

Wird es noch weitere Bücher der Serie Toronto Tales geben?

Es gibt derzeit drei Bücher. Ich habe immer beabsichtigt ein weiteres Buch dieser Serie zu schreiben, und ich ziehe ein Spin-off ebenfalls in Erwägung.

Wer war der am schwierigsten zu schreibende Charakter der Toronto Tales Serie?

Definitiv Kurts Mutter. Meine Mutter war eine gefühlskalte Frau, die sehr ausfallend werden konnte und mich nicht im Geringsten unterstützte. Daher fiel es mir sehr schwer, eine sympathische, liebende Mutterfigur zu schreiben.

Zu guter Letzt. Woran arbeitest du zur Zeit?

Pornostars! Oder eher, ein Ex-Pornostar trifft einen Handwerker. Klingt wie ein schlechter Porno Plot, nicht wahr? Aber ich bin beinahe fertig damit, und ich denke, es ist eine gute Story. Danach werde ich an einem Sequel von einem meiner Bücher arbeiten – aber ich hab noch nicht entschieden, welches es sein wird!

Vielen Dank für die Fragen – ich liebe es über mein Schreiben zu reden, und ich hoffe, ihr hattet Spaß dabei mich ein wenig näher kennenzulernen.

 

German Interview with D.W. Marchwell

June 9, 2015

Ich bedanke mich herzlich bei D.W. Marchwell, der sich bereit erklärt hat, an diesem Interview teilzunehmen und euch Lesern Frage und Antwort zu stehen. Auch ein großes Dankeschön an euch Leser, denn ohne euch wäre dieses wunderbare Interview nicht zustande gekommen.

Zuallererst: Verrate etwas über dich, das deine Leser überraschen würde.

Es gibt nicht vieles über mich was ich nicht schon in meinen Büchern erwähnt hätte, aber die meisten überrascht es, dass ich ein ausgebildeter Opernsänger bin. Ich bin ein „Light Baritone“ (auch genannt: Baryton-Martin) und absolvierte Jahre lang professionelle Auftritte, während ich tagsüber unterrichtete. Meine Spezialität war „German Lieder“, vor allem alles von Schubert. Ich liebe es, Schubert zu singen!

Kannst du uns fünf deiner Lieblingsbücher nennen?

Meine fünf Lieblingsbücher – ohne bestimmte Anordnung – sind: „Halway Home“ von Paul Monette, da in dieser Story zwei Brüder – einer schwul, einer nicht – lernen, was es heißt, den anderen zu lieben. „Dance on the Earth“ von Margaret Laurence, da sie schon immer eine meiner kanadischen Lieblingsautoren war. „Caught Running“ von Abigail Roux und Madeleine Urban, da ich durch dieses Buch begrifft, dass auch meine Geschichten publiziert werden können. „English: The Mother Tongue and How It Got That Way“ von Bill Bryson, da mich Sprachen schon immer brennend interessiert haben. Und „Soldier“ von AKM Miles, da dieses Buch eine sehr wichtige Botschaft übermittelt, und zwar, dass eine Familie mehr ist, als in sie hineingeboren zu werden.

Was hat dich dazu gebracht, M/M Romanzen zu schreiben?

Schon seit ich denken kann, habe ich Geschichten geschrieben, aber erst als ich „Caught Running“ las, begann ich, mich über den Verlag zu informieren, der es publizierte. Ich begriff, dass es eine Zielgruppe für meine Art  von Büchern gab. Wie das Schicksal so spielte, reichte ich das Manuskript von „Gut zu wissen“ (Good to Know) ein, das angenommen und publiziert wurde. Dann folgten 15 weitere Geschichten.

Ich hoffe, die Frage ist nicht zu privat, wenn ja, musst du natürlich nicht darauf antworten: Wie vereinst du deine Liebe zum Schreiben mit deinem Real Life (Familie, Freunden, dem Partner etc.), ohne dass einer dabei zu kurz kommt?

Die Frage ist nicht zu persönlich. Es gibt kaum Konflikte zwischen meinem Schreiben und meiner Familie oder Freunden. Ich habe einen Partner und meine Freunde haben mich immer unterstützt und auch verstanden, dass es Tage gab, an denen ich zu Hause bleiben musste, um zu schreiben und deshalb nichts mit ihnen unternehmen konnte. Viele meiner Freunde sind sowieso verheiratet und haben Kinder, und sind auch selbst sehr beschäftigt, und wir versuchen uns zu treffen, wann immer es uns möglich ist.

Woher nimmst du deine Ideen? Was inspiriert dich? Fließen private Erlebnisse oder Menschen, die du getroffen hast, in deine Geschichten mit ein?

Meine Ideen entstehen durch Erlebnissen in meinem realen Leben. Ich sehe etwas in den Nachrichten, oder schnappe etwas im Lebensmittelgeschäft auf, und schon entsteht eine Idee über eine mögliche Geschichte in meinem Kopf.  Alle meine Bücher basieren also auf einem Ereignis oder einer Situation in meinem Real Life, die ich selbst erlebt oder über die ich gelesen habe.

Legst du dir schon einen Plot (mit vorgegebenen Situationen) zurecht bzw. weißt du schon zu Beginn wie deine Protagonisten gestrickt sind, oder agierst du während des Schreibens spontan?

Eigentlich ist es eine Mischung aus beidem. Ich beginne die Geschichte immer mit einer Idee, mit einer Vorstellung, was passieren könnte, aber wenn ich dann schreibe, erzählen mir die Charaktere selbst was sie erleben sollen. Es ist eine leise Stimme in meinem Kopf, die mir manchmal einen anderen Weg aufzeigt, den die Charaktere dann gehen werden.

Schreibst du an mehreren Büchern gleichzeitig oder konzentrierst du dich lieber nur auf eines?

Ich konzentriere mich immer nur auf ein Buch. Ich lese nicht mal – zum Vergnügen – während ich schreibe, weil ich nicht von dem gelesenen beeinflusst werden möchte, oder vielleicht sogar vergesse, was ich selbst schreiben wollte. Ich plane vielleicht ein Buch, während ich ein anderes schreibe, aber ich arbeite immer nur an einer Geschichte.

Was für eine Szene war die am schwersten zu schreibende?  

Die am schwersten zu schreibenden Szenen sind immer die, wo ein Kind oder ein Tier verletzt ist oder wird. Zum Beispiel, „Paradies in Aussicht“ (An Earlier Heaven). Ziemlich am Ende der Geschichte, versteht William, was es mit Frau Zimmerman auf sich hat. Das war eine sehr schwierige Szene, die ich schreiben musste.

Gibt es bestimmte Lieder, die du während des Schreibens gerne hörst? Wie sieht dein Schreiballtag im allgemeinen aus?

Passend zu meinem musikalischen Hintergrund und meinen österreichischen Großeltern, die immer klassische Musik hörten, höre ich klassische Musik, während ich schreibe. Einer meiner Lieblingskomponisten ist Felix Mendelssohn. Ich höre am häufigsten seine Musik. Ansonsten trinke ich während des Schreibens auch gerne eine heiße Tasse Tee. Und ich lösche alle Lichter – aber ich weiß nicht warum. LOL

Wenn du mit einem deiner Protagonisten einen trinken gehen könntest, für wen würdest du dich entscheiden und warum?

Das ist eine sehr gute Frage. Hmm. Ich denke, ich würde mich für Barkley Reinhardt von „Pictures on Silence“ entscheiden, da er mir sehr ähnlich ist. Wir beide lieben Musik, zu singen und Tiere. Aber ich würde auch gerne Scott von „Falling“ und „When Memory Fails“ treffen. Er ist Komponist, und ich würde ihn gerne fragen,wie es sich anfühlt, ein Musikstück aus dem Nichts zu kreieren.

Welcher deiner Charaktere ähnelt dir charakterlich am meisten?

Ich habe viele meiner Persönlichkeitseigenschaften auf verschiedene Charaktere übertragen. David, von der Serie „Gut zu wissen“ (Good to Know), unterrichtet wie ich und liebt Kinder. Barkley von „Pictures on Silence“ liebt Musik und Tiere, und singt für sein Leben gern. Und Hank, von der „Falling“ Serie, hat eine schwierige Beziehung zu seiner Familie, genau wie ich. Aber ich würde sagen, dass Barkley mir am ähnlichsten ist.

Hast du schon einmal abfällige / beleidigende Bemerkungen zu deinen Büchern erhalten? Wenn ja, wie hast du darauf reagiert?

Was abfällige oder  beleidigende Bemerkungen betrifft – ich denke, viele Autoren erhalten solche Kommentare – bin ich keine Ausnahme. Ich sehe mir keine Reviews an, seit ich Bücher schreibe, die die Leser unterhalten und genießen sollen. Aber wenn ich höre oder lese, dass jemand eine beleidigende Bemerkung gemacht hat, nehme ich einfach an, dass dieser Person meine Geschichte oder mein Schreibstil nicht gefallen hat, und mache einfach weiter.

Hast du vor, irgendwann die Länder zu besuchen, in deren Sprachen deine Bücher übersetzt wurden?

Ich habe bereits die meisten Länder besucht, die in meinen Geschichten vorkommen, und ich werde eines Tages definitiv wieder an diese Orte zurückkehren. Ich war sehr oft in Europa und genoss Deutschland, Österreich, Schweiz und Frankreich. Es fiel mir leichter, durch Frankreich und im Süden der Schweiz zu reisen, da ich französisch spreche, aber ich habe auch mein bestes versucht, um in Deutschland und Österreich deutsch zu sprechen. Und die Leute waren sehr geduldig und freundlich. Obwohl sie besser englisch sprachen als ich deutsch, haben sie meistens gelächelt und geduldig gewartet, dass ich das, was ich sagen wollte, aussprach. Außerdem habe ich eine anzestrale Verbindung zu Deutschland und Österreich, die Vorfahren meiner Mutter kommen aus Österreich und Bayern.

Letzte Woche veröffentliche DSP die deutsche Übersetzung von deinem Buch An Earlier Heaven (Paradies in Aussicht). Was hat dich inspiriert, diese Serie (Good To Know) zu schreiben? War es immer schon als Serie geplant?

Es war nicht als eine Serie geplant. „Gut zu wissen“ war eine der ersten Geschichten, die ich geschrieben habe. Es war 1981 und ich hatte gerade erst die High School beendet. Ich habe immer wieder Geschichten über schwule Männer gesucht, die sich verliebten und bis an ihr Lebensende glücklich zusammen lebten, aber ich konnte nie eine finden. Deshalb entschloss ich mich, meine eigene Geschichte zu schreiben. Erst 2009 dachte ich darüber nach, dass ich diese Geschichte möglicherweise einreichen könnte, da es immer eine meiner Liebsten war. Es gab ein paar Änderungen, aber es ist im Grunde dieselbe Geschichte, die ich vor 30 Jahren geschrieben habe. Ich dachte erst an eine Serie, als ich realisierte, dass die Protagonisten mehr zu sagen hatten.

Welcher Protagonist der Serie war für dich am schwersten zu schreiben?

William war der am schwersten zu schreibende Charakter, da – obwohl ich täglich von Kindern umgeben bin – ich mich sehr darauf konzentrieren musste, was er in verschiedenen Situation sagen, tun oder fühlen würde. Es war schwierig, sich vorzustellen, was ein 10-jähriger denken und wie er sich verhalten würde.

Gibt es eine Szene im Buch, die dich besonders berührte?

Wenn ich schreibe, bin ich darauf konzentriert, die Wörter auf Papier zu bringen, aber die Szene, als Cory zurückkam um zu bleiben, war sehr berührend. Natürlich, ich hatte diese Szene geplant und wusste immer, dass Cory zurückkommen würde, aber als ich sie schreiben musste, bemerkte ich, dass mir Tränen in den Augen standen (da William endlich seinen Bruder bekam).

Wir haben gehört, dass du leider keine Bücher mehr publizieren wirst. Was sind deine Zukunftspläne?

Es ist wahr, dass ich nicht mehr publizieren werde, und viele Leute fragten mich per E-Mail nach dem Grund. Um es klarzustellen: Ich schreibe noch immer, habe aber keine zukünftigen Pläne, meine Bücher von einem Verlag publizieren zu lassen. Ich mochte diese Pingeligkeit von ihnen nicht, ebenso wenig, dass sie versuchten, Aspekte meiner Geschichten zu ändern, die man eigentlich nicht ändern musste. Ich sage niemals nie, und werde möglicherweise wieder mal etwas von einem Verlag veröffentlichen lassen, aber zur Zeit bin ich damit glücklich, für mein eigenes Vergnügen zu schreiben. Es gibt ein paar Geschichten, die ich seit meiner Ankündigung, dass ich keine Bücher mehr publizieren werde, geschrieben habe, und die man auf dieser Website, die ich extra dafür angelegt habe, finden kann:

http://marchwellbooks.weebly.com/

Diese Geschichten gibt es nur in englischer Sprache. Also, sollte jemand englisch verstehen und will ein paar Bücher kostenlos lesen, könnt ihr meine Geschichten, die nicht von einem Verlag veröffentlicht wurden, hier finden. Sie sind für jedermann und unentgeltlich. Aber ich muss euch warnen: Ich bin der schlimmste Korrekturleser, den es überhaupt gibt, also solltet ihr euch dazu entschließen, ein oder zwei Geschichten zu lesen, stellt euch auf viele Fehler, Tippfehler und andere Irrtümer ein. LOL

German Interview With H.B. Pattskyn: Paranormal and BDSM Author

May 20, 2015

Ich bedanke mich herzlich bei H.B. Pattskyn, die sich bereit erklärt hat, an diesem Interview teilzunehmen und euch Lesern Frage und Antwort zu stehen. Auch ein großes Dankeschön an euch Leser, denn ohne euch wäre dieses wunderbare Interview nicht zustande gekommen.

 Zuallererst: Verrate etwas über dich, das deine Leser überraschen würde.

Vielen Dank für diese Gelegenheit! Hmmm … eine Sache, die Leute überraschen würde, wenn sie mich irgendwo treffen oder auf einer Convention sehen, wäre, dass ich extrem introvertiert bin. Aber ich bin nicht wirklich schüchtern. Das verwirrt die Leute. Eigentlich „mag“ ich es, mit Leuten zu reden. Aber nach einiger Zeit kann es ziemlich erschöpfend sein, auch wenn ich mit meinen Freunden oder meiner Familie zusammen bin. Ich muss dann irgendwann gehen und meine Batterien an einem stillen Ort wieder aufladen.

Was hat dich dazu gebracht, M/M Romanzen zu schreiben? Wie lange schreibst du schon und wie lange hat es gebraucht, bis du von einem Verlag publiziert wurdest?

Ich begann mit dem Schreiben in der zweiten Schulstufe. Wir hatten die Aufgabe, eine Geschichte zu schreiben, und dabei die bereits gelernten Wörter zu verwenden. Es machte so viel Spaß, dass ich weiterschrieb. Ich bin jetzt 46, ihr könnt euch also ausrechnen, wie lange das her ist. *grins

Ich begann Fanfiktions zu schreiben, als Reaktion auf die schreckliche-nein-das-haben-die-nicht-wirklich-getan dritte Staffel von Ron Koslows „Die Schöne und das Biest“ (Eine Menge Fans der Serie schrieben nach der dritten Staffel Fanfiktions). Nach ca. 20 Jahren fing ich mit Torchwood Fanfiktions an, weil ich neugierig war, was wohl zwischen den Episoden passieren könnte – und vor allem, weil ich mehr von Jack und Ianto, ein heißes M/M Pärchen der Serie, sehen wollte. Viele meiner Fans ermutigten mich dazu, Bücher zu schreiben und zu publizieren. Ich versuchte es und erhielt eine Menge Absagen (so läuft das nun mal), was mich dann etwas zögern ließ.

Dann hatte ich die Idee zu einer Story, die einfach nicht mehr verschwand. Als das Buch geschrieben war, musste ich einfach irgendwas damit tun, weshalb ich es bei Dreamspinner Press (mein absoluter Lieblingsverlag) einreichte. Ich erwartete natürlich eine Absage. Ich war gerade dabei, mir Gedanken darüber zu machen, wo ich es als Nächstes einreichen sollte, als ich eine E-Mail mit dem Betreff „Vertrag“ erhielt. Ich denke, ich starrte ca. 10 Minuten auf den Bildschirm, ehe ich die Mail öffnete, und hab mich wohl auch grün und blau gezwickt, weil ich es einfach nicht glauben konnte. *grins*

Ich hoffe, die Frage ist nicht zu privat, wenn ja, musst du natürlich nicht darauf antworten: Wie vereinst du deine Liebe zum Schreiben mit deinem Real Life (Familie, Freunden, dem Partner etc.), ohne dass einer dabei zu kurz kommt?

*kicher* Wenn ich die Lösung gefunden habe, lasse ich es euch wissen! Ständig kommt etwas zu kurz. Glücklicherweise habe ich einen wundervollen und unterstützenden Ehemann und richtig gute Freunde, die verständnisvoll sind, wenn ich sage, dass ich ein Treffen sausen lassen muss, weil die Musen in Höchstform sind. Aber es kann auch das Gegenteil der Fall sein. Letztes Jahr zogen wir in ein neues Haus (ein wunderschönes 100 Jahre altes Haus in Detroit), und deshalb konnte ich nur sehr wenig schreiben. All meine kreative Energie wurde gebraucht, um die alten Böden zu schleifen und neu zu lackieren (manche wurden mit Fliesen und Linoleum bedeckt), und Farbe von den wunderschönen Hartholzleisten abzukratzen.

Schreibst du an mehreren Büchern gleichzeitig oder konzentrierst du dich lieber nur auf eines?

Im Moment schreibe ich an mehreren Büchern gleichzeitig. Ich hoffe, das klappt weiterhin so gut, damit ich zwei Bücher in nächster Zeit beenden und einreichen kann!

Gibt es bestimmte Stärken und Schwächen, die du als Autor besitzt?

Unsicherheit ist meine größte Schwäche. Bei jeder Geschichte komme ich zu einem Punkt, wo ich davon überzeugt bin, dass alles schlecht ist und ich das Handtuch werfen sollte. Gerade dann hilft es, wenn man eine unterstützende Familie und ein helfendes Netzwerk von Schreibkollegen hat.

Eine meiner Stärken ist das Schreiben von Dialogen. Es ist eines der Dinge, wo ich am häufigsten positives Feedback erhalten habe, als ich noch Fanfiktions schrieb, und wo das Schreiben von Fanfiktions auch ziemlich geholfen hat. Ich schrieb über bereits bestehende Charaktere, deshalb war es wichtig, sie nicht zu verändern. Und gerade Dialoge sind ein großer Teil davon, eine Person in einer Geschichte einzigartig zu machen.

Hast du einen bestimmten Schreiballtag und wie lange schreibst du durchschnittlich an einer Geschichte?

Meine Tage sind zur Zeit noch recht unbeständig. Mein Mann und ich teilen uns ein Auto (es ist der einzige Weg, dass es finanziell klappt, dass ich als Vollzeitautorin arbeiten kann), und meine Tochter hat einen Job, bei dem sie um Mitternacht anfängt zu arbeiten. Mein neuer Tag besteht als darin, sie um 23 Uhr zur Arbeit zu bringen, heimzukommen, ins Bett zu gehen, mit meinem Mann um 4 Uhr aufzustehen, ihn zur Arbeit zu fahren, meine Tochter um 7 Uhr abzuholen (versuchen, dazwischen ein wenig zu schreiben), mehr zu schreiben – oder dumme Computerspiele zu spielen, je nachdem wie müde ich bin! Irgendwann versuche ich ein Nickerchen zu machen und / oder ein wenig Hausarbeit oder Gartenarbeit zu erledigen. Dann hole ich meinen Mann um 14 Uhr ab. Zur Zeit bin ich am Morgen am kreativsten, aber ich versuche mich auf meinen neuen Zeitplan einzustellen und bin damit zufrieden, wenn ich mal 1000 Wörter hier und 1000 Wörter da schaffe. Mein Ziel ist es, 3000 Wörter an einem Tag zu schaffen, aber manchmal klappt das eben nicht.

Zwei Tage die Woche arbeite ich ehrenamtlich für die AIDS Partnership Michigan.

Was für eine Szene war die am schwersten zu schreibende?  

Eines meiner derzeitigen Projekte ist die Fortsetzung von „Das graue Halsband“. Es geht aber nicht um Jason und Henry, obwohl sie natürlich vorkommen werden, sondern um Derrik. Der Typ, mit dem er am Ende zusammenkommen wird, lebt am Anfang in einer missbrauchenden, gewalttätigen D/s Beziehung. Es ist ein sehr sensibles und berührendes Thema, und es fällt mir schwer, es zu schreiben, weil ich nicht daran denken möchte, dass D/s Beziehungen etwas anderes als liebevoll und einvernehmlich sein können. Obwohl ich in meiner vorherigen Ehe mit einem Mann verheiratet war, der das Konzept ganz und gar nicht verstanden hatte. Es wurde nie gewalttätig, missbrauchend (ich konnte mich sozusagen von ihm lösen, ehe es zu diesem Punkt kommen konnte) aber das Potenzial war da. Es fällt mir schwer, einen Dom zu schreiben, der so sehr meinem Exmann ähnelt. Es gab nämlich ein paar Situationen, wo er mich wirklich verängstigt hatte.

Du hast zeitgenössische und eine paranormale Geschichte geschrieben. Welchen Stil bevorzugst du und warum?

Ich denke, paranormale Geschichten, weil sie dir viel Spielraum und Freiheiten lassen, um kreativ zu sein und Spaß zu haben – aber in letzter Zeit waren meine Ideen eher den zeitgenössischen Geschichten zugehörig, deshalb schreibe ich mehr Bücher in diesem Genre. Genauer gesagt, ich schreibe all das, was meine Musen mir diktieren. *grins*

Gehörst du auch zu den Autoren, die von der Muse ständig Arschtritte bekommen, vor allem, wenn sie etwas will, das dir aktuell so gar nicht in den Zeitplan passt?

Auf jeden Fall!

Hast du schon einmal abfällige / beleidigende Bemerkungen zu deinen Büchern erhalten? Wenn ja, wie hast du darauf reagiert?

Möglicherweise war die abfälligste Bemerkung, der Satz: „Oh, du schreibst homoerotische Romanzen? Wo veröffentlichst du deine Geschichten online?“ Es war sehr frustrierend, dass er gleich dachte, dass ich mit Geschichten dieses Genres, bei keinem Verlag veröffentlichen kann oder für meine Arbeit bezahlt werde.

Als Antwort auf seine Frage sagte ich lächelnd, dass er meine Bücher ja gerne auf der Seite meines Verlages oder auf Amazon nachschlagen könnte.

Jemand anderes dachte, ich würde selbst veröffentlichen. Ich habe überhaupt nichts dagegen, wenn Autoren ihre Bücher selbst veröffentlichen – mich irritierte nur die Annahme, dass er dachte, dass wohl kein Verlag M/M Romanzen veröffentlichen würde. Ich habe ihn höflich korrigiert, und wieder auf Dreamspinner verwiesen – ebenso wie auf all die anderen tollen M/M Verlage.

Hast du vor, irgendwann die Länder zu besuchen, in deren Sprachen deine Bücher übersetzt wurden?

Ich möchte unbedingt mal nach Deutschland! Und auch einige andere europäische Länder besuchen.

Letzte Woche veröffentliche DSP die deutsche Übersetzung von deinem Buch Das graue Halsband (Bound: Forget Me Knot). Hat dir die Muse eines Tages die Idee (auch das Thema BDSM) zugeflüstert oder inspirierte dich etwas anderes?

*grins* Ich stand beim Tisch eines Händlers bei einer lokalen Science Fiction Convention (nicht die, wo sich Henry und Jason trafen, aber sie war der Convention sehr ähnlich) und gegenüber von mir erblickte ich diesen umwerfenden, jungen (19 oder 20 Jahre alt) Kerl, gekleidet in einem Netzshirt, seine Nippelpiercings waren deutlich zu sehen. Schräg gegenüber war ein Lederwaren Händler (mehr Steampunk als BDSM Zeug, aber es gab auch ein paar Halsbänder und Handschellen). Ich konnte nicht anders, als die beiden in meinen Gedanken zusammenzubringen.

Wird es eine Fortsetzung geben? Oder sind andere Bücher geplant, die das Thema BDSM beinhalten?

Neben Derriks Geschichte (die Fortsetzung von „Das graue Halsband“) arbeite ich an einer weiteren BDSM Geschichte, die Visceral heißt, und die ich sehr liebe. Mittlerweile habe ich ungefähr 70 000 Wörter geschrieben, also wird sie bald fertig sein.

Kannst du ein bisschen über dein Buch Hanging by the Moment erzählen? War der Plot geplant oder entwickelte es sich während des Schreibens?

Ich hatte nicht geplant, ein Buch über HIV zu schreiben, als ich mit der Geschichte von Daniel und Pasha begann. Ich hatte gerade erst „Das graue Halsband“ beendet, und wollte daher etwas leichtes und schmerzloses schreiben. Aber leicht und schmerzlos ist in meinem Wortschatz wohl nicht vorhanden. Ich hatte ungefähr 10 000 Wörter geschrieben und wollte mich gerade etwas hinlegen, um eine Pause zu machen, als mich Daniel darüber informierte (und zwar in der Art und Weise wie Charaktere manchmal die Autoren vor vollendete Tatsachen stellen), dass er HIV-positiv sei.

Nein.

Niemals. Das war nicht das Buch, das ich schreiben wollte.

Aber es war das Buch, das geschrieben werden musste.

Wegen der Recherche zu dem Thema endete ich als ehrenamtliche Mitarbeiterin bei der AIDS Partnership Michigan. Es bricht mir mein Herz, dass noch immer so viele falsche Informationen im Internet über HIV und AIDS zu finden sind. Es ist kein Todesurteil. Es ist keine Krankheit, die jemand haben möchte, aber man kann sich damit arrangieren und leben.

Ich weiß, eine Menge Leser mieden „Hanging by the Moment“, wegen dieses Themas, aber es ist keine depressive, traurige Geschichte. Es ist eine Geschichte über einen Mann, der sich in einen anderen Mann verliebt, der HIV-positiv ist.

Zu guter Letzt. Woran arbeitest du zur Zeit?

Neben Derriks Geschichte und Visceral, arbeite ich an dem Buch A Place to Belong, das mich ziemlich mitgenommen hat. Es ist eine weitere Geschichte mit einem schwierigen Plot, der Selbstverletzung, Straßenprostitution und eine Beziehung mit einem erheblichen Altersunterschied beinhaltet. Es ist einer der Fälle, wo ich, egal was ich schreibe, denke, dass es Mist ist (obwohl mir vier Beta Leser gesagt haben, dass sie es lieben, und das sind Leute, die ich sehr respektiere). Ich denke, wenn ich Visceral beendet habe, werde ich mich wieder auf diese Story stürzen (Ich begann mit Visceral, weil ich eine Pause brauchte – und weil ich an der Reihe war, etwas in einer Kritikergruppe zu schreiben, und ich wollte nichts von A Place to Belong posten, weil die Geschichte gerade bei einem Beta Reader war, und ich zu der Zeit nur deren Meinungen hören wollte).