15 Ideas for Beating Writer’s Block with Leesa Love

August 2, 2016

Dreamspinner’s staff member, Leesa Love, shares her tips on beating writer’s block.

KEEP CALM AND WRITE SOMETHING

Writer’s Block is no stranger to most dedicated writers. It staunches the creative flow, leaving the most seasoned authored wondering what to write next. There are about as many methods for battling writer’s block as there are remedies for the common cold, so decide which works best for you! Here are some of our favorites.

Set a daily goal.This idea is practiced by many successful authors, including Stephen King and Nicholas Sparks. Whether it’s 500 words or five pages, encourage yourself to write everyday so that it becomes a reliable part of your routine rather than an activity to make time for.

Write badly and freely. A significant portion of writer’s block is caused by fear of bad writing. Give yourself permission to freewrite without the pressure of perfection. Set a timer and write whatever comes to mind; don’t interrupt your thoughts to edit until the end.

Transform a fairy tale...

Transform a fairytale. Another way to take the pressure off of your creativity is retelling a well-known story with your own voice. Having the structure of a story such as a traditional fairytale already in place gives you room to flex your imagination and experiment with your writing. 10 Creative Ways to Beat Writer’s Block Fast

Change your atmosphere. Your surroundings affect the flow of creativity more than you would think. While setting a daily routine may help, if you find yourself stuck at a desk behind a blank computer screen, consider switching things up. Write with a notebook and pen, write at a different time of day or in a different room. Consider heading out to a park or coffee shop for real-life inspiration.

Change Your Atmosphere

Set the mood. Are you writing a sexually charged scene? Light some candles and play soft background music to help set a romantic tone. If you’re writing a more light-hearted scene, sit in the sunshine and play something more upbeat for the right vibe.

Listen to playlists for writer’s block. Similar to study playlists, writer’s block playlists can keep you focused on your writing as well as inspire you by further setting the mood for your story. Find playlists HERE.

Give your characters a new problem. In his book Writer’s On Writing, Stephen King suggests that writer’s block stems from an insignificant problem, or lack of a problem altogether. Raising the stakes for your characters through introducing a new, radical problem can force the story in a new direction and bring out new aspects of the characters themselves.

Take your character out of the story. Make them wash the dishes! Sometimes you can be so caught up in the story, it becomes difficult to separate your character’s motivations from your own. Putting your character in a simpler situation can allow you to flex their personality and create a more solid characterization.

Research and plan. Allow your own story to re-inspire you by researching the elements that brought the story together. Find out more about the town your character is from, or imagine the character’s childhood in the world you’ve created. Whether it’s for worldbuilding or character background, fleshing out a new detail can be the key to the next scene in your story.

Revisit. Recall those moments when you were truly inspired. Read that poem that spoke to you, watch a movie that made you itch to write, or read the first chapter of your favorite book. Remind yourself why you write, and why you chose to be a writer.

Collaborate. Find author forums online or call up a friend to brainstorm ideas. Allow them to offer new perspectives for the scene you’re stuck on, or to inspire you with their own projects and ideas. 6 Coolest Ways to Write a Story

Do mindless tasks. Rather than force creativity to happen, sometimes you need to give your brain a break. Turn down the internal noise and let your mind wander as you take a shower, vacuum, or complete other simple chores. 18 Ways to Cure Writer’s Block

Take on a different creative project. Paint a picture, try a new recipe, or put together a model. Like mindless tasks, small artsy projects give your brain a break from hard thinking, but still encourage your imagination, making creative thoughts flow more effortlessly.

 

Exercise.

Exercise. If getting your creative juices pumping isn’t enough to fight off writer’s block, try getting your blood pumping! Moving your body can clear your thoughts and also keep you healthy. Check out our post on writer’s health for more tips!

Brian Moreland’s Glass-of-Water Technique. This author’s technique for beating writer’s block within 72 hours is all about intention. Before bed, Moreland thinks his intentions for the next day’s writing session into a full glass of water, such as tapping into his creative energy or finding his best writing form. He then drinks half of the glass, and goes to bed. Upon waking, Moreland drinks the rest of the water and immediately gives himself an hour to write uninterrupted. Completed up to three nights in a row, Moreland claims great success at overcoming his writer’s block. 7 Ways to Overcome Writer’s Block

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