Political Manifestations with Annie Kaye – Post + Giveaway

February 25, 2016

Political

Hello! My name is Annie Kaye, and I’m honoured to have been invited to introduce my novel Run on the DSP blog.

Amid the tumult of the Iowa Democratic primary, young but brilliant speechwriter Tom McAlindon meets Nathan Harris, the deputy campaign manager for an opposing candidate. Their acquaintance is strictly professional until an impetuous kiss on a cold winter night leads them into a secret romance. As their feelings deepen, both men struggle with the complications of keeping the relationship separate from their jobs and the inner workings of the campaigns.

But in the nation’s most high-stakes political game, no secret is truly safe. When an observer realizes their connection, Tom and Nate discover that striving for the best of both worlds has a much higher cost than they bargained for… and that love can’t survive while Nate is hiding the truth from Tom.

I began writing Run in 2011, before the last U.S election. Writing very slowly, it took me two years to complete the original manuscript. The idea for Run came from an older Canadian folk rock song, called Five Days in July. The song is old enough that I remember it being on the radio in 1994 when I was doing a short, ill-fated stint as a receptionist at a moving company (worst job ever, by the way).

But it was well over fifteen years later when the idea for Run came to me, and it was because of the opening line of that song – “They met in a hurricane”. For some reason it made me think of the old Democratic National Conventions of the 1960s, when the eventual presidential candidate was actually decided there at the convention; delegates camped out on the arena floor under the banner of their state; and the last-minute arrangements and deals that were being made. I envisioned two people – two men – finding each other in the midst of that atmosphere, and eventually leaving it behind, hand in hand, to drive south, choosing each other rather than all the craziness.

Once I committed to the storyline, I had a lot to learn about American politics. My husband is American and quite politically aware, so I likely started off with a greater awareness of the process than the average Canadian would need to. But at times I still struggle to wrap my head around some of the differences between your system and ours – not to mention that the two parties each have their own set of rules about how the candidates are nominated.

Although it was inspired by a song, I don’t tend to listen to music when I’m writing. I like to be really alone when I’m working, and if I can’t have quiet, I have headphones and white noise. I have a nice long rainstorm track that I loop on iTunes, or else this (really letting my freak flag fly, here): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZPoqNeR3_UA It’s the NCC-1701-D at idle. For someone who grew up as a huge fan of Star Trek: TNG, it’s the sound of home for me. I especially employ these when I’m writing at work on my lunch. I can sit in my cubicle and be mostly undisturbed.

Last fall I began working on a new story that requires some pretty heavy-duty research, which was put on hold for three months or so as I got into the content editing for Run. I’m looking forward to getting back into the research as it has me making plans to observe some team practices for a particular sport. Although I would call this activity my favourite form of exercise, I know very little about the competitive side of the sport. This manuscript will have two disparate types of athletes intersecting, and will build on a really rewarding volunteer experience I had a few years ago.

Random fact about me: I have IGS – Idealized Grandparent Syndrome. I can’t write grandparents who aren’t warm, loving, accepting people. In every longer story I’ve written, at least one of the characters has a grandparent who has had a profoundly positive influence on them. For me, it’s a way of honouring my grandparents, as well as my husband’s. They were all intelligent, compassionate, lively, and perfectly wonderful characters people; and if I’m fortunate enough to be published again, I promise kind and loving grandparents.

I make no such promises for parents. ;)

What about you? Have you had any older relatives or family friends who’ve had an effect for the better in your life? Tell me about it in the comments, below, before March 3, 2016 at 11:59 pm Eastern. One commenter will be selected to win a free digital copy of Run!

Cheers,

Annie Kaye

Check out Run today!

Blurb: 

Amid the tumult of the Iowa Democratic primary, young but brilliant speechwriter Tom McAlindon meets Nathan Harris, the deputy campaign manager for an opposing candidate. Their acquaintance is strictly professional until an impetuous kiss on a cold winter night leads them into a secret romance. As their feelings deepen, both men struggle with the complications of keeping the relationship separate from their jobs and the inner workings of the campaigns.

But in the nation’s most high-stakes political game, no secret is truly safe. When an observer realizes their connection, Tom and Nate discover that striving for the best of both worlds has a much higher cost than they bargained for… and that love can’t survive while Nate is hiding the truth from Tom.
Bio:

Annie Kaye’s first ‘real’ job was a career in insurance. After fourteen years, the industry had wrung from her everything it could, leaving her desperate for a change that would allow her to flex her long-dormant creativity. She left her job and took several months off, planning to spend them on the couch in her yoga pants. Not six weeks had elapsed before she’d rediscovered a long-lost love: putting words to paper. Since 2009 she has written almost a million words of fiction, each piece bearing a common theme: love and relationships between gay men.

Balancing family, work, creative efforts, and community involvement – and trying to hit the gym once in a while – are all near the top of Annie’s to-do list. At her home in the woods of rural Ontario, Canada, she endeavours to carve out her writing space from amid the joyful noise created by her husband, their two children, one dog, one cat, and the woodpeckers who sharpen their beaks on her windowsills.

Website: www.anniekaye.com
Twitter: @anniekayefic
Facebook: www.facebook.com/anniekayefiction
(More third-party vendor links available on my FB page)

5 Responses to “Political Manifestations with Annie Kaye – Post + Giveaway”

  1. Susan says:

    I was blessed with two sets of grandparents who believed in the American dream that you can be whatever you want to be. My Italian grandfather was thrilled I went to college and although he did not live long enough to see me get my PhD, I know he would have been proud.

  2. Angela says:

    Congrats on the release of Run, and i wish you a happy release day on february 26th. The blurb sounds good :)

    My grandmother (mother of my mother) was a great woman She was a very down to earth/no nonsens woman but when you got a question or a problem you could go to her and she would try to help and listen and just be the best grandmother anyone could wish for.
    unfortunately she died when i was twelve, but she was definitely one of the people who i looked up to.

  3. Lisa says:

    Neither set of my grandparents were a big influence and my parents were kinda mean. In a way, they were a positive influence because they shaped me into what I DIDN’T want to be for my own kid. I didn’t always succeed, but my parenting style was less corporal. My dad’s mom was a schoolteacher & big about reading so maybe she helped shape me into the book junkie I now am. I remember how happy she always was when I tested above my grade level.

  4. Sara says:

    I’ve had a close relation to both of my grandmothers. My mother’s mother took care of me when my own parents worked until I was eight and she died.

    My other grandmother, I had a very close relation to during my teens. For years I used to visit her several afternoons a week after school, and she taught me to drink coffee and told me my whole family’s history while I visited. My grandmother in her turn had been brought up by her father’s mother so even though she is now gone I have through my grandmother’s stories access to 150 years of my family history. It gives you a strong sense of who you are and where you’re coming from.

  5. Annie Kaye says:

    Susan – I think sometimes my grandparents were more proud of my accomplishments than my parents were. Perhaps it increases exponentially with subsequent generations. :)

    Angela – Thanks so much for your well wishes. :) Your maternal grandmother sounds a bit like mine, very down to earth. She was quite independent, lived alone, and once she retired she would drive or take the train all over eastern Canada and US to visit her ten kids. She didn’t take any sh*t from anyone. ;)

    Lisa – I totally can relate to what you’re saying about using your parents’ style as something you actively avoid. I have been very aware, as my kids have gotten older, of not emulating my mother. My sister and I have a pact to call each other on it if we see the other doing it. :P

    Sara – what a great gift you have in your family history! I regret not asking my grands more about their childhood when they were alive.

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