EU Tax Laws and Dreamspinner Press

January 26, 2015

Dreamspinner Press is proud to be international publishers of quality gay romantic fiction. Currently in addition to English, Dreamspinner Press publishes books in German, Italian, French, and Spanish. Dreamspinner Press books can be purchased around the globe.

Some of our international readers have recently commented on higher tax rates on ebooks purchased at the Dreamspinner Press store. The reason is as of January 1, 2015, the European Union (EU) changed the tax law regarding the sale of digital goods, including ebooks. All retailers, including Dreamspinner Press, are required to track the location of buyers and apply the appropriate VAT tax based on that country’s specific VAT rate. The collected VAT tax is sent quarterly to each of the 28 EU countries with a VAT return. Companies selling digital goods, like Dreamspinner Press, are required to maintain records for audit for ten years. Click here for more information on VAT taxes.

We truly value our international readers as part of the Dreamspinner Press family.  We want to continue offering quality gay romantic fiction to our international readers and must therefore comply with local tax laws.

As always, Dreamspinner Press will continue to offer frequent discounts and coupon codes to help stretch all readers’ book budgets. The Dreamspinner Press weekly newsletter often has coupon codes so subscribe here to receive yours.

If you have further questions please email contact@dreamspinnerpress.com.

Happy reading!

7 Responses to “EU Tax Laws and Dreamspinner Press”

  1. Shirley Ann Speakman says:

    I’m from England and it is a really pain having to pay tax at 20% and it’s soon adds up and can be quite expensive. The EU is always going on at us saying we have be greener and what can be greener than buying E-books! It’s ridiculous stupid EU!!

  2. Andrea says:

    Hate this too. But even more annoying is that in Germany the sales tax on print books is 7%. On ebooks, however, it is 19%. Go figure.
    But does that mean that the country of residence is the determining factor or your current location?

  3. Andrea M says:

    I hate that for your international readers but I hate it even more for DSP. That’s got to be an accounting nightmare.

  4. Angela says:

    I absolutely think it´s very unfair to have a higher tax on e-books than on print books. I have to pay 21% tax :(
    on e books while the print books in my country are 6%.

  5. Sara says:

    I too am sorry for this, and how it affects everybody involved, readers, authors and publishers alike. I’ve been aware of the tax since the beginning of the year. And it’s already put a dampener on my reading/book-buying habits.

    As a Swede I now pay 25% tax (one of the highest in EU, I believe only Hungarian customers pay more, and most of the regular discounts at DSP are almost completely eaten up by the new tax/VAT rules) and as if that is not enough the Swedish currency is at its lowest point in comparison to the dollar in what must be several years,the actual increase in cost is even more than that.

    As much as I hate it, I will be more careful with my purchases and I fear new authors and those “maybe”-titles will be the ones suffering. I too wish ebooks would be taxed the same as print books (which is 6%), what a difference it would make.

  6. Andrea says:

    Oh yes, let’s not forget the nosedive the Euro took… I agree, that definitely affects my book budget as well. :( But the extra 20% hurts even more. I am just glad that DSP allows combining coupons and sales and offers them quite frequently. So a big thank you for that!!

  7. Jen says:

    @Sara: As a fellow Swede I know what you mean, I was just about to make an order (I’ve recently moved house so I haven’t had the money to shop recently) but now that I noticed the new cost I’ll have to trim the shopping cart quite a lot. 25% extra for every book, on top of the crappy exchange rate, really hurts.
    I’ll probably have to be far more selective in future as well and only shop during sales to at least get back to a sort of normal cost.

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